Browse Prior Art Database

Measuring sweat rate using one or more humidity sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000233972D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 142K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Because sweating’s primary purpose is thermoregulation, measuring sweat rate during physical exercise, normal every-day activity, and sleeping can provide valuable insights. High sweating can lead to dehydration, which may cause impairment of mental and physical performance, and of heat dissipation, and can pose serious risks to health [1-5]. We propose to measure sweat rate using one or more humidity sensors in a simple setup by measuring the humidity flux originating from a person’s skin. One main advantage of this setup compared to others is that we reduce the influence of the measurement setup on the skin, which might change composition of sweat by preventing water evaporation, which in turn may block sweat gland ducts and cause a progressive fall in sweating rates [6].

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

Measuring sweat rate using one or more humidity sensors

Abstract

Because sweating's primary purpose is thermoregulation, measuring sweat rate during physical exercise, normal every-day activity, and sleeping can provide valuable insights. High sweating can lead to dehydration, which may cause impairment of mental and physical performance, and of heat dissipation, and can pose serious risks to health [1-5].

We propose to measure sweat rate using one or more humidity sensors in a simple setup by measuring the humidity flux originating from a person's skin. One main advantage of this setup compared to others is that we reduce the influence of the measurement setup on the skin, which might change composition of sweat by preventing water evaporation, which in turn may block sweat gland ducts and cause a progressive fall in sweating rates [6].

Background

There are several ways to measure sweat rate: discontinuous methods, such as, e.g., measuring naked-body weight difference after exercise corrected for fluid intake or outtake, or continuous methods, such as, e.g. galvanic skin response. Other methods are predominantly applied in controlled laboratory settings, such as, e.g., wash-down techniques. One drawback of these methods is that they influence the sweat production of the skin section under examination, for example by covering a certain amount of skin surface, which in turn leads to less accurate measurements of sweat rate [6].

Design

For measuring sweat rate, we propose a setup with a reduced coverage of skin, which leads to a minor alteration of sweat rate. This setup can also be miniaturized and allows sweat rate measurements in very small devices.

One or more humidity sensors are placed on the side of a hollow structure in contact with the skin. Humidity flux generated by sweating is then measured by the sensor(s). The hollow structure favors perspiration and evaporation by not blocking the skin surface.

Figure 1 shows an exemplary scheme in which two humidity sensors are employed. The hollow structure, for example a cylinder made of plastic, can assume several sizes. We suggest a diameter smaller than 2 cm and a height of less than 3 cm. Important for the accuracy of the measurement is that 1) humidity sensors are close enough to the skin and that 2) the distance between them is not too big. As reference values, we suggest to maintain a distance between the skin and the first (lower) sensor smaller than 0.5 cm, and a distance between the lower sensor and the second (higher) sensor bigger than 0.1 cm. If t...