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System and Method for System Settings and Configuration Replication Based on Common Aspects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234076D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed are a novel and non-obvious system and method to intelligently alter non-system-specific configuration settings based on similar (or the same) systems.

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System and Method for System Settings and Configuration Replication Based on Common Aspects

System configuration is always required and can vary based on the components in a system, the desired workload, or customer preference. System configuration also consumes a lot of time at various stages, such as in manufacturing, initial deployment at a customer site, or when adding more systems or updates to an existing site.

A method is needed to intelligently infer what system settings are needed based on similar systems that are reachable.

The solution is a novel and non-obvious system and method to intelligently alter non-system-specific configuration settings based on similar (or the same) systems.

To implement the system and method in a preferred embodiment:

1. Capture configuration information; capture and store the configuration information in a system (e.g., Basic Input/Output System (BIOS), Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), etc.)


2. Determine hierarchy of configuration information

A. Hierarchy may be determined based on scores or weights assigned based on date (e.g., how and when configuration settings were applied)

B. Administrators may have manually set configuration settings; administrators may also have ranks

C. Commonality of the configuration may modify the rank of the configuration (e.g., 92% of the systems of a certain Movable Type (MT)/Model and configuration may contain a certain configuration) (Figure 1); commonality of the configuration settings vs. another set of configuration settings may also effect ranking

D. A flag may be set, by an administrator or other person, indicated a preferred configuration for that type of system

E. Security may also play a role in the ranking such that more trusted configurations may be ranked higher

F. Systems may also apply configuration settings based on which was the most recently...