Browse Prior Art Database

Low Profile Slide Out For Service Safety Interlock Latch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234115D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-13
Document File: 7 page(s) / 387K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that provides a safety interlock that prevents a service person from sliding a heavy drawer too far out of the enclosure that would cause the unit to fall to the floor, causing bodily harm or property damage. This device incorporates a low profile design to perform this task in addition to providing a tactile stop point where the service person recognizes how far to slide out the system in order to service components in a particular area of the system, saving cost by not requiring multiple people or by purchasing a lift.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 42% of the total text.

Page 01 of 7

Low Profile Slide Out For Service Safety Interlock Latch

When heavy systems are slid out of an enclosure for a service action, the user often doesn't realize how heavy the object is or how far they can pull the system out before it drops, which could result in the user dropping the system which could cause damage to the system or bodily harm. Often, there are components that could be serviced by partially sliding a system out of the enclosure a specified amount. This could create enough space to service components without having to use a lift or without using multiple people to lift the system onto a separate workspace for service. There have been previous inventions that have used a spring steel latch to stop the sliding out of heavy components to prevent them from dropping. This invention incorporates a low profile design to perform this task in addition to providing a tactile stop point where the service person recognizes how far to slide out the system in order to service components in a particular area of the system, saving cost by not requiring multiple people or by purchasing a lift.

    This invention utilizes machined or cast aluminum latches (but could also be sheet metal) that reside in the space between the system planar and the chassis bottom. This latch rotates about a pivot on the chassis to engage or disengage the latch feature that protrudes out the side of the system chassis. The latch that protrudes out of the system chassis is forced in when the system is inside of the enclosure. When the system is pulled out to the partial service position, springs force the latch outward and the latches engage into latch positions on the enclosure. The partial service latches catch into the same latch opening that the system connector latches engage into, so there aren't additional features that are required on the system enclosure for this invention. This allows upwards and downward compatibility between systems that use this latch and enclosures that they plug into.

    This latch does not require additional width or depth inside the system to function. There is typically a nominal gap between a system planar and the chassis bottom for components, electrical clearances, and stiffeners. This latch operates in that gap, where these interferences do not exist. Some other latches that prevent a heavy system from falling as it's slid out require width in the system, whereas this invention does not require the space above the planar that is often used for system components, such as power supplies, storage, processors, or heatsinks. Therefore, this invention allows for a more dense system configuration, which provides a better competitive position in the marketplace.

    The invention design, described below, has numerous advantages over the existing designs outlined above. However, while this invention outwardly seems simple, its simplicity creates the most compact, cost-effective, and reliable solution and took a considerable amount of dev...