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Heat Protection by Styling Polymers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234606D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-22
Document File: 6 page(s) / 162K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Heat Protection has become an important claim for different styling products like pump sprays or mousses. The effectiveness of these formulations strongly depends on the right choice of the ingredients especially the styling polymers. Therefore we had performed a research study to identify these polymers. A commercially available heat iron was used to damage dry hair strands. Using a DSC-method after the damaging step we could show that Luviquat®Supreme (INCI: Polyquaternium-68) respectively formulations containing Luviquat®Supreme are suitable to achieve a significant heat protection effect.

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Page 01 of 6

Heat Protection by Styling Polymers

Abstract:

Heat Protection has become an important claim for
different styling products like pump sprays or mousses.

The effectiveness of these formulations strongly
depends on the right choice of the ingredients
especially the styling polymers. Therefore we had
performed a research study to identify these polymers.

A commercially available heat iron was used to damage dry hair strands. Using a DSC-method after the damaging step we could show that LuviquatSupreme (INCI: Polyquaternium-68) respectively formulations containing LuviquatSupreme are suitable to achieve a significant heat protection effect.


Page 02 of 6


1.) Hair Damaging and Product Application

Flat strands from native caucasian hair, remis, 11.5 cm free hair length, 4 cm width were prewashed using a 12 wt% solution of sodium laureth sulfate. After rinsing the strands were dried at ambient conditions.

The hair strands were wetted using a standardized method by dipping into water and subsequent squeezing with filter paper. Then the wetted strands were either dipped into the aqueous polymer solution at different concentrations or 0.5 g mousse formulation was distributed onto the wetted strand using a dyeing brush.

The pump spray was directly sprayed onto the prewashed and dry strands. Hereby in each case 0.25 g was sprayed on the front and back side of the hair strand.

After product application the strands were dried at ambient conditions.

Heat damaging was performed by a commercially available heat iron adjusted to 220 °C. The dry strands were treated for sixty times. Afterwards the strands were washed again with a 12 wt% solution of sodium laureth sulfate, rinsed and dried at ambient conditions.


2.) Evaluation of Heat Damage

The heat damaged strands were evaluated using a DSC method proposed by Wortmann et al. (Wortmann and Deutz, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 48 (1993) 137 Wortmann et al., J. Cosmet. Sci. 53 (2002) 219).

Higher peak temperatures indicate less damage of the treated hair strands.


3.) Results


3.1) Polymer Solutions

Hair strands were prepared with different aqueous solutions of LuviquatSupreme according to the procedures described above.

Concentrations of 0 % AS (no polymer), 1 wt% AS, 2 wt% AS, 3 wt% AS and 5 wt% AS were chosen.

Furthermore a trial without polymer for the heat treatment and subsequent dipping into a 3 % AS solution before DSC analysis was performed to exclude polymer effects during DSC analysis.

The final results are depicted in figure 1. Data table of figure 1 is attached in the appendix.

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Fig.1: Heat protection effect of LuviquatSupreme

The heat protection effect correlates to the concentration of LuviquatSupreme. The subsequent treatment of heat damaged with this poly...