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Alternate approach toward IPV6 VRRP High Availability using single interface with two IPV6 address leveraging IPv4 VRRP protocol for VRRP failover detection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234649D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-24
Document File: 4 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

For implementations that have Internet Protocol (IP)v4-based Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) v2 and IPv6 stacks running, disclosed is an alternate approach that leverages IPv4 VRRP advertisement that saves time and operates with less complexity and minimal code changes, achieving an equivalent IPv6 High Availability (HA) without implementing VRRP v3.

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Alternate approach toward IPV6 VRRP High Availability using single interface with two IPV6 address leveraging IPv4 VRRP protocol for VRRP failover detection

This design leverages the Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) for Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) Active/Standby functionality to achieve the IPv6 High Availability (HA). VRRP IPv4 is running on the both the master and backup for a particular

VRRP group. Two IP addresses, namely primary and secondary, are specified on the IPv6 interface. The primary IPv6 is used as the Real IP (RIP) and the secondary address is a shared Virtual IP (VIP)v6 address and is used as a gateway on the external (wireless/internal) routers.

The Real IP is unique for both the master and backup routers, but the virtual IP is the same on both the routers on a particular interface.

Figure 1: Overall design of a Typical VRRP setup

GWIP = Gateway IP address

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Master/Backup Election

The Real IP and Virtual IP are configured on both the switches via the switch administrator. When the VRRP IPv4 election for the Master/Backup is completed, the Real IP is enabled for the IPv6 stack (routing and Network Deployment (ND)) on both the switches, but the Virtual IP is enabled only on the VRRP Master (detected by IPv4).

The new master enables the virtual IP address on the IPv6 interface. After the VIP interface is enabled on the new master switch, an Unsolicited Neighbor Advertisement message is sent out on all the external ports that are members of the same Virtual Local

Area Network (VLAN) as that of the VIP interface. The VRRP master, not the backup switch, responds to the Health Check (ping) to the Virtual IP from the external routers.

When the VRRP failover occurs, all the IPv4 interfaces are failed over to the...