Browse Prior Art Database

Bluetooth hardware emulation for full automated testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234696D
Original Publication Date: 2014-Jan-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2014-Jan-29
Document File: 5 page(s) / 120K

Publishing Venue

Microsoft

Related People

Eric Li: INVENTOR [+8]

Abstract

As the Bluetooth ecosystem evolves where Bluetooth and Bluetooth Smart brands continue to gain momentum as the preferred wireless technology in emerging products, the Bluetooth community of developers and manufacturers continues to struggle with testing and/or quality assurance of their products. Manual testing is time intensive and often incomplete, as not every device can be tested against every radio. Manual testing is also inadequate to find bugs early on in the product cycle while the device firmware is still under active development. The end users’ frustration due to Bluetooth interoperability issues lowers their trust in the Bluetooth brand. The currently existing mitigation to the interoperability dilemma is to attend UnPlugFest (UPF) events created and hosted by Bluetooth SIG around the world. UPF provides a forum for host and profile subsystems as well as peripheral device and controller manufacturers to perform limited ad hoc interoperability testing and opportunistically identify some interoperability issues prior to releasing compliant Bluetooth products into market. While this is a good intuitive approach to catch visible, easier to find interoperability bugs earlier in the product development cycle, relying solely on UPF or other infrequent interoperability events and manual tests as the main way to identify most interoperability issues is neither effective nor efficient, especially for complicated and harder to reproduce issues that require more iterations and longer and deeper investigations that may not even fit in UPF test sessions. Having observed and experienced the pressing need for a common reliable mechanism to perform automated interoperability testing and product quality evaluation in the Bluetooth community, Microsoft began researching and developing an automated Bluetooth interoperability test tool as the solution to the Bluetooth interoperability testing problems. The Microsoft Bluetooth Interoperability Test Tool (BITT) provides a simple, measureable, and repeatable mechanism for automating Bluetooth user scenarios across all possible Bluetooth profiles using both retail and development device firmware. It empowers developers and manufacturers of Bluetooth products with an economically efficient and easy to deploy mechanism to assess the quality of their Bluetooth products. BITT allows them to run end-to-end interoperability scenarios at any time during their development cycle, at their own pace and cadence and with any revision of their hardware, firmware or software.

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Document Author (alias)

Eric Li (erili)

Defensive Publication Title 

Bluetooth hardware emulation for full automated testing

Name(s) of All Contributors

Robbie Harris

Shirin Ebrahimi-Taghizadeh

Jeff Guebert

David Hargrove

Sean Kelly

Ha Nguyen

Luiz Felipe Campos Tenaglia

Summary of the Defensive Publication/Abstract

As the Bluetooth ecosystem evolves where Bluetooth and Bluetooth Smart brands continue to gain momentum as the preferred wireless technology in emerging products, the Bluetooth community of developers and manufacturers continues to struggle with testing and/or quality assurance of their products.  Manual testing is time intensive and often incomplete, as not every device can be tested against every radio.  Manual testing is also inadequate to find bugs early on in the product cycle while the device firmware is still under active development.  The end users’ frustration due to Bluetooth interoperability issues lowers their trust in the Bluetooth brand.

The currently existing mitigation to the interoperability dilemma is to attend UnPlugFest (UPF) events created and hosted by Bluetooth SIG around the world. UPF provides a forum for host and profile subsystems as well as peripheral device and controller manufacturers to perform limited ad hoc interoperability testing and opportunistically identify some interoperability issues prior to releasing compliant Bluetooth products into market. While this is a good intuitive approach to catch visible, easier to find interoperability bugs earlier in the product development cycle, relying solely on UPF or other infrequent interoperability events and manual tests as the main way to identify most interoperability issues is neither effective nor efficient, especially for complicated and harder to reproduce issues that require more iterations and longer and deeper investigations that may not even fit in UPF test sessions.

Having observed and experienced the pressing need for a common reliable mechanism to perform automated interoperability testing and product quality evaluation in the Bluetooth community, Microsoft began researching and developing an automated Bluetooth interoperability test tool as the solution to the Bluetooth interoperability testing problems.

The Microsoft Bluetooth Interoperability Test Tool (BITT) provides a simple, measureable, and repeatable mechanism for automating Bluetooth user scenarios across all possible Bluetooth profiles using both retail and development device firmware. It empowers developers and manufacturers of Bluetooth products with an economically efficient and easy to deploy mechanism to assess the quality of their Bluetooth products. BITT allows them to run end-to-end interoperability scenarios at any time during their development cycle, at their own pace and cadence and with any revision of their hardware, firmware or software.

Description:  Include architectural diagrams and system level data flow diagrams if: 1) they have already been prepared or 2)...