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Browse Prior Art Database

Tube Stabilizer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234702D
Publication Date: 2014-Jan-30

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

2013P00141

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 15% of the total text.

Page 01 of 16

Docket No. 2013P00141 US TUBE STABILIZER

         The present disclosure relates to, e.g., tube stabilization, and more particularly to novel and inventive tube stabilization system, device and method/process.

         Endotracheal tubes ("ET" tubes) are generally available commercially. An example of a commercially available endotracheal tube is the Mallinckrodt ET tube, shown in Figure 1, for example.

         Endotracheal tubes are typically used as "breathing tubes‟ for when a patient cannot breathe independently, such as during anesthesia. An inflatable "cuff‟ or other type of anchoring mechanism can be located on the tube (e.g., at or near the distal end of the tube) and used to lock the tube in place with respect to the patient as well as to prevent or restrict air and/or anesthesia from blowing back through the trachea around the endotracheal tube. See, e.g., Figure 2, which illustrates an exemplary inflatable "cuff‟ located on an endotracheal tube at the distal end of the tube and configured, positioned and sized to (i) lock the tube in place with respect to the patient‟s trachea and (ii) prevent or restrict air and/or anesthesia from blowing back through the trachea around the endotracheal tube.

         A syringe of air at or near a proximal location on the endotracheal tube can be used to inflate the inflatable cuff (or other inflatable device, including, without limitation, doughnut, balloon, etc.) located on the tube at or near the distal end of the tube. For example, the syringe can be inserted into a valve to a "pilot balloon‟ that is attached to a small plastic hose which is attached to one or more "air channel(s)‟ in the endotracheal tube. There can be one or multiple openings in a portion of the air channel(s) within the cuff structured to allow air to pass into the cuff and inflate the cuff. Thus, as the plunger of the syringe is depressed, air is forced through the value into the pilot balloon into the hose then into the channel(s) and then into the cuff via the opening(s), thereby inflating the cuff. See, e.g., Figures 3 and 4.

         Some devices, such as a Nested Cannula, for example, can be introduced through an endotracheal tube and into the lungs. The endotracheal tube can be used as a launch device, reaching through the vocal chords and above the carina.

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Docket No. 2013P00141 US 2

         Nested Cannula can be defined, for example, as minimally invasive nested interlocking devices (e.g., tubes) that are specifically designed, built, selected and/or configured to work together as a set so as to be deployable to reach a particular target in a specific patient without surgery. See, e.g., US 2011/0201887 A1, which is the publication of U.S. Patent Application No. 13/123,591, entitled INTERLOCKING NESTED CANNULA, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

         Although an endotracheal tube can be used as a launch device as described above, for example, there typical...