Browse Prior Art Database

Extending Supported Stored Procedure Languages In A DBMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234824D
Publication Date: 2014-Feb-10
Document File: 4 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that allows programmers to create and register a cross compiler that supports ongoing Stored Procedure Language (SPL) development in a preferred programming language. The disclosed method includes a "pluggable" cross compiler that is developed to a well-defined interface, which compiles the new SPL into the well-defined set of primitive language constructs.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

Page 01 of 4

Extending Supported Stored Procedure Languages In A DBMS

The method disclosed herein permits database application developers to develop Stored Procedures (SP) in a programming language with which said developers are most comfortable or can be most productive. Current Database Management Systems (DBMS) specify one or more programming languages that are supported for the development of stored procedures, but do not provide a the disclosed method to extend or "plug in" support for additional languages. Most DBMSs provide support for developing SPs in the vendor's proprietary Stored Procedure Language (SPL), as well as Java* and C.

Programmers familiar with one vendor's proprietary SPL may prefer to continue working in that language even while working with another vendor's DBMS. This may be because of skills in one SPL or the presence of a large base of existing SPs that would have to be converted from one vendor's SP language to another. Other programmers may prefer to develop SPs in other traditional programming languages that are not generally supported for stored procedures.

Currently, the only language choices for developing stored procedures are the specified languages and related support provided by the DBMS vendor. Developers familiar with

Vendor #1 SPL cannot continue working in that language when working with a DBMS from Vendor #2.

The disclosed method allows programmers to create and register a cross compiler that supports ongoing SPL development in a preferred programming language. Embodiments of the disclosed method include a "pluggable" cross compiler that is developed to a well-defined interface which compiles the new SPL into the well-defined set of primitive language constructs. The DBMS then compiles the primitive language constructs into the executable format for normal processing.

Software managers, database administrators, financial analysts and others benefit from this the disclosed method, as it allows better reuse of existing resources and investments. Training requirements are minimized, since development staff is able to leverage skills gained from using Vendor#1 when moving to Vendor#2. Many database applications contain large numbers of SPs. Converting these SPs from the SPL of

Vendor#1 to the SPL of Vendor#2 can be cost prohibitive, and thus limiting the application availability on various DBMS. The disclosed method allows the use of these same SPs developed for Vendor#1 on the DBMS from Vendor#2, and thus increasing the applications available for Vendor#2.

The programming language in which the SPL is written is clearly specified in the signature of the SP. The SPL processor in the DBMS recognizes that language directive and then loads the corresponding SPL cross compilation library. Once loaded, the SPL processor cross compiles the SP to the primitive language constructs, and then compiles to DBMS specific byte code. This format is stored in the appropriate database tables for subsequent execution.

1


Pag...