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V2V OBD MONITORS EXECUTION AND ABORT STATUS INFORMATION EXCHANGE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000234892D
Publication Date: 2014-Feb-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 222K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

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V2V OBD MONITORS EXECUTION AND ABORT STATUS INFORMATION EXCHANGE

Vehicles sold in North America are required to perform Evap Leak Diagnostics. For federal states, a leak size of 0.04" needs to be detected. For green states, a leak size of 0.02" needs to be detected. A typical


0.04" leak detection test uses engine vacuum to evacuate the fuel tank while the vehicle is cruising at steady speed. (Steady State vehicle speed > 40mph). Any disturbance during the bleed-up phase of the leak detection, such as heavy engine load, hill climb/descent, bumpy road, stop and go traffic, sharp turns in the road, causes the OBD Evap monitor to abort execution. Disturbances mentioned above can yield false monitor results hence for the abort. Also, Evap leak detection monitor is intrusive to other engine functions. Specifically, while the Evap monitor is executing, the canister cannot be purged since the Evap system is sealed and fresh air is not flowing into the canister to displace fuel vapors. Failure to adequately purge out the canister can cause increased levels of evaporative emissions into the atmosphere. If the vehicle knew ahead of time that the road ahead is "noisy" (stop/go traffic, hilly, bumpy, windy, etc.), then it would not attempt to execute the Evap leak detection. The canister purging would not get interrupted and would continue to function unimpeded. By 2017, the U.S. and other governments may mandate V2V as a requirement in vehicles.

Method

Our method uses V2V c...