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Filler plug

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235445D
Publication Date: 2014-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A filler plug (FP) is a device that retains the balls or rollers (rolling elements) in a slew-ring (or blade bearing) after assembly. Traditionally the FP was made of steel and was secured in place with a robust tapered pin (TP) that passed through the bearing ring and FP. This system needed to be strong because the FP tended to carry significant loads from the rolling elements. In some prior art arrangements, a cylindrical pin has been used instead of a tapered one.

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Filler plug

A filler plug (FP) is a device that retains the balls or rollers (rolling elements) in a slew-ring (or blade bearing) after assembly. Traditionally the FP was made of steel and was secured in place with a robust tapered pin (TP) that passed through the bearing ring and FP. This system needed to be strong because the FP tended to carry significant loads from the rolling elements. In some prior art arrangements, a cylindrical pin has been used instead of a tapered one.

Due to new improvements in blade bearing designs, the FPs are required to carry less load; in some designs they even no longer carry any load at all from the rolling elements. This allows them to be made in a simpler, lighter and cheaper way. The present idea proposes that the FP is instead moulded in a more elastic material, e.g. a plastic, and can be retained in place by a simple fixing means on the outside of the bearing, e.g. a simple screw, instead of the expensive tapered pin. Furthermore only one sealing O-ring may be required instead of the traditional two. There are additionally significant savings by the elimination of various machinings.

The left-hand sketch shows the traditional FP and TP (highlighted) in position in the bearing. The right-hand sketch shows an embodiment of the proposed and potentially much cheaper arrangement using a moulded plastic FP installed in the bearing with a single fixing screw.

             

Obviously the present idea is not limited to the presentl...