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A METHOD TO PERFORM CLEANING OF EVAP SYSTEMS AT ASSEMBLY PLANTS EOL STATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235612D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 234K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

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A METHOD TO PERFORM CLEANING OF EVAP SYSTEMS AT ASSEMBLY PLANTS EOL STATIONS

Vehicles sold in North America are required by EPA regulations to have an Evap system. In addition, OBDII regulations require leak diagnostics to be performed on the Evap system. The leak diagnostics checks for as small as 0.02" sized leaks in Green states. A typical Evap system is composed of many parts that are molded, flash welded, etc... Flash contamination from the manufacturing process is ever present. Evap systems are very sensitive to presence of contaminants due to leak check requirements. A new Evap system is likely to have contaminants in it from shipping, manufacturing, and even assembly plant airborne contaminants. Warranty data reveals that significant Evap 0.02" leak DTCs occur at low mileage. This infant mortality is due to contaminants being inside the Evap system that works its way to the seals in the CPV and CVS valves over time.Some contaminants become sticky over time as they are exposed to fuel vapor, carbon dust and sometimes oil residue. It is vital that these contaminants get flushed out early in vehicle service.

Method

This process performs an Evap system cleaning cycle at the EOL dynamic rolls station in the plant. Opening the CPV at 100% and pulsing the CVS causes contamination to travel in the direction of the engine intake without risk of stalling the engine. The canister is typically clean at EOL station since the fuel tanks are only filled to 15-20% capa...