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A Method and System for Managing Hot Spare Requirements in a Redundant Array of Independent Disks Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235615D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and system is disclosed for managing the number of hot spare storage modules required in a Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) environment. The method and system limits the usable capacity of storage modules in RAID arrays to control the number of hot spare storage modules required throughout the life cycle of the RAID arrays.

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A Method and System for Managing Hot Spare Requirements in a Redundant Array of Independent Disks Environment

In a Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) system, hot spare storage modules are used to rebuild data, subsequent to failure of a storage module of the RAID system. While increasing the number of hot spare storage modules results in higher fault tolerance, the amount of usable capacity of the RAID system decreases. Therefore, selecting an appropriate number of hot spare storage modules is critical for balancing high fault tolerance with usable capacity of the RAID system.

When the number of hot spare storage modules is selected based on capacities of the storage modules, a change in capacity can result in a change in the number of hot spare storage modules required. For example, consider a scenario wherein a hot spare storage module is required for an existing capacity in the RAID system. If a new capacity is subsequently introduced, then an additional hot spare storage module would be required. In some situations, the change in capacity can be a result of an end of life scenario wherein a given capacity of storage module is no longer available. The change in capacity causes a hot spare storage module to have a larger capacity than a failed storage module.

A change in the number of hot spare storage modules can also result in a restriction in an allowable RAID configuration. For example, consider a RAID configuration initially containing an eight storage module RAID array, and a seven storage module RAID array with one hot spare storage module. If storage modules in the eight storage module RAID array are replaced with larger capacity storage modules, then the number of hot spares required may need to be increased from one to two. The increase in the number of hot spare sto...