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AUGMENTED REALITY FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235728D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-24
Document File: 6 page(s) / 719K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Vidar Borthne: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An application is provided that lets video conference participants use their own devices to see, browse to and select available video and content sources. The augmented reality makes the navigation easy to understand. Unlike continuous presence, this solution provides each participant with a personalized control over what to focus on in a video conference.

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AUGMENTED REALITY FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING

AUTHORS:

Vidar Borthne

Ingrid Kvaal

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    An application is provided that lets video conference participants use their own devices to see, browse to and select available video and content sources. The augmented reality makes the navigation easy to understand. Unlike continuous presence, this solution provides each participant with a personalized control over what to focus on in a video conference.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    In a video conference there may be several video streams and content sources available. The video conference (VC) system must, in these situations, prioritize which of these streams and sources to focus on, for instance, through voice switching and user controlled presentation.

    The problem is that VC participants might want to focus on streams or
sources other than what the VC system is showing. When several participants are sharing one VC system in meeting room this problem becomes especially apparent. Participant A might want to focus on one thing, while participant B wants to focus on something
else. Though it might be possible to change what the VC system is focusing on or showing, doing so would disturb the other participants in the meeting room.

    Today, meetings are disturbed by the different participant's different needs for seeing a different view of the far (remote) end, checking how they are appearing on screen, or otherwise changing the disposition or priority of streams on screen. A participant's experience is limited because he does not want to disturb the meeting by doing this or asking for it. By giving each participant his own auxiliary view, each participant can see what they want without disrupting the flow of the meeting.

Copyright 2014 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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    Accordingly, an application is provided that runs on participants' devices, such as tablets or smartphones or any other Bring Your Own Device (BYOD). The client on the smartphone and the video conference endpoint communicate to the same backend server. When a call is made, the client on the mobile device is connected into the same meeting. Since they are localized in the same room (e.g., by Cisco's Intelligent Proximity capabilities), the meeting experience on the mobile device is a...