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Method of repositioning laser generated keyboard using finger position

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235736D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to reposition a laser-generated keyboard to accommodate the needs of the user. The method uses infrared to assess the location of the user’s index fingers based on duration of non-movement (i.e. rest), which, in turn, allows a laser to display separate portions of the keyboard to enable a positive user experience.

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Method of repositioning laser generated keyboard using finger position

Virtual laser keyboards project an image onto a flat, non-reflective surface using a red diode laser. The laser shines through a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE), which is simply a small image of the keyboard. The DOE, along with special optical lenses, expands the image to a usable size and projects it onto a surface. Situated near the bottom of the device is an infrared laser diode, which shoots out a thin plane of infrared light running parallel to the surface only millimeters above the image of the keyboard. When typing, the user's fingers pass through certain areas of the infrared light.

To move the keyboard location, the user moves the projector. A user can make the image a QWERTY keyboard (US) or any other type of keyboard in the configuration setup. Manufacturers allow the user to adjust the size of the keyboard to accommodate individual hand size. However, a static display is always projected in front of the user. A traditional keyboard allows for a "feel" of the keys where a user can adjust to the placement of the F and J keys; the index fingers naturally gravitate to the F and J keys. A laser keyboard does not provide such a "feel".

A method is needed for synchronizing a virtual laser keyboard with the F and J keys on a traditional QWERTY keyboard (or other keys for international keyboard varieties).

The novel contribution is a method that uses infrared to assess the location of the user's index fingers, which, in turn, allows a laser to display separate portions of the keyboard. The method can present a split keyboard with a non-synchronized vertical...