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Predictive Time Management for Shared Presentation Sessions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235845D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-26
Document File: 4 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed are an application and method to use predictive analytics to pre-estimate how much time a presenter requires based on factors such as presentation material, the presenter’s presentation history, the audience, and similar presentations. This application helps amend situations in which presenters at the beginning of a meeting, who speak beyond the designated time, prevent subsequent presenters from having enough time to cover all pertinent material.

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Predictive Time Management for Shared Presentation Sessions

During a meeting in which multiple presenters have allocated time slots, when one

presenter exceeds a designated length of time, subsequently, other presenters do not have ample time, if any, to present.

Current art to address this problem relates to placing participants on individual time schedules. In advanced systems, dynamic rescheduling of the remaining portions of the overall meeting time can take place when a presenter runs over a designated time. Patent publication US2013/0024772, "Computer-based display presentation time management system" [1] covers a dynamic system. However, this system does not effectively prevent the cascade situation from arising; participants can still run over an allocated period, the audience has little opportunity to react, and presenters

with shorter time windows have little motivation and little capability to compress a

presentation in real-time.

A better approach is to have presenters trim material precisely as needed, prior to presentation. The disclosed application uses predictive analytics to pre-estimate how much time a presenter requires based on factors such as presentation material, the presenter's presentation history, the audience, and similar presentations. This computed measure applies a number of ways to encourage the presenter to alter either the material/content or the time window in order to finish within the constraints of the designated period.

The novel contribution is a method to pre-calculate the likely presenter speed for a set of draft presentation materials based on a range of historical evidence. The pre-calculated time is then used to:


• Encourage material changes, until the estimated time fits into desired time

window

• Adjust other presenters' time windows, prior to presentation
• More accurately estimate total presentation length when used in conjunction

with real-time presentation monitoring

In response, the application presents unique patterns on the presenters' mobile devices to indicate an estimation of how much the presenter needs to speed up or slow down a presentation.

High-level steps:

1. The system pre-calculates how much time each presenter needs, based on a variety of factors such as slide content, similar presentations, and audience size (See details section for full range to use in analytics.)

2. The system uses pre-calculated presentation times to fit the presenter in an associated time window by adjusting material or by reallocating time windows across the presenters

3. During the presentation, the system monitors presentation speed and recalculates estimates in real-time

4. The system displays to the presenter the estimated overrun/underrun, based on a historical estimate and current progression


5. Finally, the system leverages existing art to re-balance presentation time

1


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windows in real time as individuals run over time or end short of the

designated time

Key steps:

1....