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COMPRESSOR ROTOR FRONT STAGES LEAKAGE FLOW REDUCTION USING SEALING WIRE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235910D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The invention proposes a technique to control leakage to the main flow path in compressor rotor front stages. The technique includes a wire seal in compressor rotor front stages. As shown in figure 1, the wire seal is provided between T34 and R4. Another wire seal is provided between T23 and R3. Such wire seals reduces rotor critical outflow leakages of R2 and R3.

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COMPRESSOR ROTOR FRONT STAGES LEAKAGE FLOW REDUCTION USING SEALING WIRE

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to turbines, and more particularly to leakage control in turbine compressor rotor front stages.

Generally, in a turbine, compressor front stage axial gap between T-Fairing and blade under platform is large. The compressor front stage axial gap is large due to stack up, binding and wheel movement, among others. Such gap results in more leakages to a main flow path. As a result, performance of the compressor is reduced.

A conventional technique relates to a rotor assembly for a steam turbine. The rotor assembly includes a stacked rotor section having rotor plates. The rotor plates include a main body portion having a plate shape, a first axial face and a second axial face. The second axial face is opposite to the first axial face. The rotor plates further include an airfoil base surface at an outer radial edge of the main body portion. The rotor plates also include buckets. Buckets are extended radially outward from the airfoil base surface. The rotor plates further include a seal. The seal prevents steam exposure to the first and second axial faces.

Another conventional technique relates to a sealing arrangement for bucket cooling circuit in a gas turbine engine. The seal design is responsive to a centrifugal force. The seal is provided between turbine rotor spacer, axial end faces of the turbine rotor wheel and bucket dovetails of the gas turbine engine. The seal minimizes leakage of the bucket cooling air.

However, the conventional techniques are not efficient enough in controlling leakage of cooling air to the main flow path.

Therefore, there is a need in the art for a technique to control leakage...