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In-Line Patch Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235953D
Publication Date: 2014-Mar-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Mike Ginn: INVENTOR

Abstract

This disclosure covers a non-contact method of communicating with a Vitals Patch during the conversion process. It makes use of a Near Field Communication technique where a loop antenna is part of the structure of the electrode structure. To test the Patch the electrode loop is energised remotely via a transmitter and this induces small signals into the electrode(s) to stimulate the processing circuits. In this way the mechanically integrity of the patch is maintained and the unreliability of mechanical contacts eliminated. The loop could either be part of the silver printing or a wire loop attached as a component.

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Title: In-Line Patch Testing

Inventor: Mike Ginn

Description of Invention: This disclosure covers a non-contact method of communicating with a Vitals Patch during the conversion process.  It makes use of a Near Field Communication technique where a loop antenna is part of the structure of the electrode structure.  To test the Patch the electrode loop is energised remotely via a transmitter and this induces small signals into the electrode(s) to stimulate the processing circuits.  In this way the mechanically integrity of the patch is maintained and the unreliability of mechanical contacts eliminated.  The loop could either be part of the silver printing or a wire loop attached as a component.

Nature of the Problem: The Vitals Patch will need to be tested in-line during the conversion process.  This would be the final test to ensure that there are no failures at the point of packaging.  Probing the electrode structure would work but this would violate the integrity of the electrode gel seal.  It would also be mechanically challenging to probe such a structure while converting.  Additionally the signals are very small and not suited to probing techniques.  The use of an inductive couple would overcome these issues.