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WEB PAGE VALUE SCORE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000235998D
Publication Date: 2014-Apr-01

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Bill Skeet: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A Page Value Score (PVS) is presented that is useful for evaluating the value of web pages. The PVS is the product of a statistical tool that analyzes a specific set of web page metrics, normalizes the data and assigns appropriate weights to the metrics. When this score is generated across a large population of pages, it allows a content manager to compare pages based on the value the page delivers to its audience.

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WEB PAGE VALUE SCORE

AUTHORS:

  Bill Skeet Jeffrey Davis Naga Shunmugam

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    A Page Value Score (PVS) is presented that is useful for evaluating the value of web pages. The PVS is the product of a statistical tool that analyzes a specific set of web page metrics, normalizes the data and assigns appropriate weights to the metrics. When this score is generated across a large population of pages, it allows a content manager to compare pages based on the value the page delivers to its audience.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    The propagation of content on the Internet is virtually unmetered. Advances and innovation enable content creation at an increasingly rapid rate. Poorly managed content proliferation has consequences. New content, old content, good content and bad content all live in apparent equality to web users. Users have a difficult time finding the information that they need. Web site managers have a difficult time delivering value to the business.

    The costs for websites also scale as the number of web pages increases. Yet the skills and tools to effectively manage content lag behind the growth of web pages. When web site owners decide to reduce or clean up their content, they tend to follow superficial rules that are primitive compared to the tools for creating and manipulating information. Content owners typically look at simple characteristics such as 'how old is the page?' and 'how many people viewed a page recently' to determine whether to keep or remove a page.

    This is akin to choosing a fantasy football player based on age and how many minutes they played in games. While it is true those are interesting metrics, they are far too simplistic to reliably reveal how valuable a player really is to the team. Consequently, sports teams (and fans) are increasingly obsessed by more sophisticated metrics, indexes and ratings derived from multiple types of data. These formulas are based on

Copyright 2014 Cisco Systems, Inc.
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characteristics that correlate with contributing value to the team. And they lead to statistical models that help team owners decided which players to draft, which to trade and which to invest in.

    There is ample data to take a similar approach to evaluating web pages in order to make appropriate decisions for managing content on web sites. Such statistical tools would allow the custodians of web sites to identify pages that are 'working hard' from those that are not working. A score that can reveal this would lead to better decisions and more effective and efficient web sites. Unlike professional athletes, whose performance changes from day to day and year to year as they play, a web page does not change by itself. Therefore, a score describing past performance of a web page is much more likely to be a predictor of future performance.

    High-performing websites are made of high-performing web pages. The challenge for web managers is to identify which web pages are high performers,...