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A Smart Adaptive Ice Maker to Match Consumer's Demand

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236033D
Publication Date: 2014-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A system and method which varies the amount and frequency of ice production based on demand for the ice (i.e. adaptive ice production) is disclosed.

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A Smart Adaptive Ice Maker to Match Consumer 's Demand


Disclosed is a system and method which varies the amount and frequency of ice production based on demand for the ice (i.e. adaptive ice production).

Basics:

Instead of filling up the ice bucket until some sensor indicates the bucket is full, this system and method uses the rate at which the ice is consumed, to adjust the controls of the ice maker.

It would also use historical information to anticipate the need of different amounts of ice on any given day of the week.

In addition to historical data that might be collected, it could also make use of other data sources to better anticipate amount of ice needed in the future.

Room temperature and weather forecast data could be used to adjust anticipated ice needs, based on seasonal weather changes.

Personal calendar data and other social media sites like Evite*, could be used to further adjust the anticipated ice needs based on planned trips and parties.

Other data, such as humidity inside and outside of the freezer, water temperature, water quality, etc, could also be used to adjust ice production.

By using existing technologies, one can monitor ice consumption and determine the rate of ice consumption for any given 24 hour period.

By monitoring ice consumption over an extended period of time, one can determine the average rate of ice consumption for any given day of the week, and anticipate the amount of ice needed for any given day of the week in the future.

Using this information, the frequency of ice making could be dynamically adjusted based on the anticipated needs.

For example, if based on historical data, the amount of ice consumed on Fridays was 7% of a bucket. Let's say the bucket holds 20 trays of ice, so one tray would raise the bucket ice level by 5%.

And let's say that the desired minimum amount of ice in the bucket is set to 5%.

Thursday night, the sensors would determine that the ice bucket is 9% full.

Since the anticipated ice consumption for Friday is 7% of the bucket, one tray of ice would be produced to bring the level up to 14% and then it would stop.

If on Friday, more than 9% was consumed so the level dropped below 5%, additional trays of ice would be produced to keep the level at 5% or higher.

Friday night, the sensors would determine that the ice bucket is 6% full. If the anticipated ice consumption...