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SECURITY AND RECORD KEEPING METHOD AND DEVICE FOR INFUSION PUMP

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236254D
Publication Date: 2014-Apr-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 13K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related Documents

US2007/0260491: PATAPP

Abstract

We propose the use of a “SmartKey” with an infusion pump system. An infusion pump may require that an appropriate SmartKey be presented in order to accept user input and/or unlock a medication reservoir attached to the pump. A SmartKey may be a small device easily carried by a staff member. A SmartKey may include a memory such as an electronic data storage chip. Proprietary or industry standard devices and/or data storage protocols may be employed. An infusion pump may be equipped with a key slot to accept a SmartKey, with the key slot incorporating an interface needed to communicate with the memory of the SmartKey. Use of a non-standard interface could provide barriers to unauthorized duplication, fabrication, tampering, or falsification of SmartKeys. In the proposed system, the SmartKey may contain user and other information. Infusion pumps could be programmed to allow users only to operate pumps consistent with their authorization(s). A mechanical lock could be driven by the SmartKey in a similar fashion as locking devices on infusion pumps today. For additional security, a SmartKey may be combined with communication with hospital administration software. The proposed SmartKey system can provide a way to secure pumps and controlled substances that also may record and/or return valuable user information. Because a user programming/commanding a pump would be identified by her/his SmartKey, the system potentially would possess all data needed for the records and thus could automatically log the necessary information.

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Page 01 of 3

SECURITY AND RECORD KEEPING METHOD AND DEVICE FOR INFUSION PUMP

Abstract

    We propose the use of a "SmartKey" with an infusion pump system. An infusion pump may require that an appropriate SmartKey be presented in order to accept user input and/or unlock a medication reservoir attached to the pump. A SmartKey may be a small device easily carried by a staff member. A SmartKey may include a memory such as an electronic data storage chip. Proprietary or industry standard devices and/or data storage protocols may be employed. An infusion pump may be equipped with a key slot to accept a SmartKey, with the key slot incorporating an interface needed to communicate with the memory of the SmartKey. Use of a non-standard interface could provide barriers to unauthorized duplication, fabrication, tampering, or falsification of SmartKeys.

    In the proposed system, the SmartKey may contain user and other information. Infusion pumps could be programmed to allow users only to operate pumps consistent with their authorization(s). A mechanical lock could be driven by the SmartKey in a similar fashion as locking devices on infusion pumps today. For additional security, a SmartKey may be combined with communication with hospital administration software. The proposed SmartKey system can provide a way to secure pumps and controlled substances that also may record and/or return valuable user information. Because a user programming/commanding a pump would be identified by her/his SmartKey, the system potentially would possess all data needed for the records and thus could automatically log the necessary information.


Page 02 of 3

Disclosure

    In a typical hospital setting in the United States, a variety of substances such as narcotic painkillers need to be controlled to mitigate the risk of drug theft and/or misuse. Strict requirements have been developed for physical control (e.g., keeping the controlled substances under lock and key) and for record keeping. In the response to the requirements for physical control, infusion pump manufacturers have developed methods for securing the infusate while it is attached to the pump. In some cases the medication reservoir is locked directly to the pump itself. Such locking arrangements can be cumbersome for care providers. With regard to record keeping, the hospital or facility generally requires or desires a way to track who authorized or started the drug delivery of a controlled substance. Currently this is handled with a system outside the control of the infusion system, typically an electronic medical record (EMR) or paper-based system. Such indirect tracking can lead to incorrect entries into patient and/or other medical records.

    Hospital and healthcare service staff desire fast, safe, and effective methods of working with infusion pumps and controlled substances. In this disclosure we propose the use of a "SmartKey" with an infusion pump system. An infusion pump may require that an appropriate SmartKey be present...