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A Process for Reducing the Polishing Time of Glass and Quartz Substrates by using 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236356D
Publication Date: 2014-Apr-22
Document File: 5 page(s) / 375K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This paper describes a new method and process for the finishing of glass and quartz substrates using 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film, before the final polishing process. Benefits include decreasing the final polishing time over 70%, while achieving a surface finish comparable to that obtained after final CMP . Glass and quartz are typical materials that are widely used for displays in mobile electronic devices as well as optical lens for various kinds of optical and electronics devices. During fabrication, the final polishing time of the glass or quartz is usually the bottleneck with respect to yield capacity. This paper discloses the superior finishing performance of 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film, 0.5 micron grade. The performance of 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film is expected to be better than with the manual operation described herein, if combined with automated lapping/polishing equipment and processes.

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A Process for Reducing the Polishing Time of Glass and Quartz Substrates by using 3MTrizactCeO Lapping Film

Abstract: This paper describes a new method and process for the finishing of glass and quartz substrates using 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film, before the final polishing process. Benefits include decreasing the final polishing time over 70%, while achieving a surface finish comparable to that obtained after final CMP . Glass and quartz are typical materials that are widely used for displays in mobile electronic devices as well as optical lens for various kinds of optical and electronics devices. During fabrication, the final polishing time of the glass or quartz is usually the bottleneck with respect to yield capacity. This paper discloses the superior finishing performance of 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film, 0.5 micron grade. The performance of 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film is expected to be better than with the manual operation described herein, if combined with automated lapping/polishing equipment and processes.

Keywords: 3M™ Trizact™ CeO Lapping Film, grinding, display, lens, glass, lapping, CMP, polishing,


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Background:

    There are many different types and geometries of displays and lenses, e.g. flat, prism, curved surfaces and spherical, which are fabricated from different materials such as glass, quartz, sapphire and the like. The surface lapping and finishing processes for these workpieces are conducted by different equipment, including single side, double-side and spherical lapping machines.

    A traditional glass/quartz polishing process is shown in Fig. 1. Prior to the final CMP polishing process, the substrates are usually ground or lapped by slurries, pellets or 3M™ Trizact™ Diamond Tile abrasives of different abrasive grades, in order to obtain a typical Ra of about 0.15-0.8 microns. The lapping and polishing process may need multiple steps and these steps typical use from larger to smaller abrasive particles, depending on the different material substrates, process equipment and process conditions. Current CMP polishing process use abrasive particles, e.g. ceria or SiO2 of specific grades, to polishing the substrate surface. The polishing process cycle time typically is from 30 minutes to 180 minutes or even as great as 5 hours, depending on the substrates being polished, abrasive type and size and process conditions. For glass and quartz polishing, the polishing cycle time is usually from about 30 minutes to 180 minutes, depending on different process conditions and whether the polishing process is one or two steps. After the final CMP polishing, the substrate surface Ra typically ranges from about
0.010 micron to 0.020 micron.

Fig. 1

The current polishing processes have several disadvantages including the following: 1) Throughput and yield capacity limitations.

2) Process instability.

3) High cost, including high electrical power and water usage, high slurry costs and high fixe...