Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

HOT SWAP SLICE INPUT/OUTPUT BUS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236519D
Publication Date: 2014-May-01
Document File: 9 page(s) / 823K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The invention proposes a technique for sharing power and high-speed data between slice input/output (I/O) modules without any requirement for a physical connection between the modules. The technique solves problems with conventional slice I/O including data speed limitations and the ability to hot-swap modules. When configured as remote I/O, the left-most module is the network interface and power supply. This provides an interface between the external network and the internal communications to the individual I/O modules to the right. An additional power module is also configured in the center which is required if the modules to its left require more power than the next left-most power supply can supply. A network interface and power supply module is also configured on the right end. This is required as part of this invention to provide redundant data and power connections to the I/O system.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 21% of the total text.

HOT SWAP SLICE INPUT/OUTPUT BUS

BACKGROUND

The present invention generally relates to slice input/output modules or backplane controller systems and more particularly to a technique for sharing power and high-speed data between slice input/output (I/O) modules.

In general, programmable logic controller (PLC) performance requirements are achieved with standard physical contacts. However, next generation applications require data rates which are difficult to achieve with conventional physical contacts.

A conventional technique includes a method of capacitive coupling communication between integrated circuits on a printed circuit board.  Another conventional technique includes capacitive coupling as a potential interface for a card cage with plug-in circuit boards. One other conventional technique is used between die stacked on a multi-chip module. One other conventional technique includes inductive methods to transfer both data and power.

However, the above mentioned conventional techniques do not provide transfer of both data and power without any physical connection between modules.  Therefore there is a need in the art to provide a technique for providing transfer of data and power without any physical contact between modules.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Figure 1 depicts distributed I/O configuration.

Figure 2 depicts local control configuration.

Figure 3 depicts expanded view of local and host control configurations.

Figure 4 details of power circuitry.

Figure 5 depicts normal data and power flow.

Figure 6 depicts data and power flow during “Hot Swap”.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The invention proposes a technique for sharing power and high-speed data between slice input/output (I/O) modules without any requirement for a physical connection between the modules.  Figure 1 depicts a typical slice I/O system which is driven by an external host controller. 

Figure 1

A key advantage to a slice I/O system is ability to add functionality with fine granularity in order to meet I/O requirements as efficiently as possible.  Typically, each I/O module includes standard mechanical and electrical interfaces on each side such that the modules are slid or snapped together in all possible combination required for a particular application. Further, the modules are not joined or separated while in operation or while power is applied.  Typically, the left-hand-most module is the system controller and system power supply. 

When configured as remote I/O as in Figure 1, the left-most module is the network interface and power supply.  The left-most module provides an interface between external network and internal communications to the individual I/O modules to the right. 

Figure 1 also depicts an additional power module in the center which is required if the modules to its left require more power than the next left-most power supply is able to supply.

Figure 1 also shows a network interface and power supply module on the right end.  Network interfac...