Browse Prior Art Database

A Method of Obfuscating User Location During Untrusted Location Sharing 

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236526D
Publication Date: 2014-May-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Untrusted location sharing is quite common in social and mobile products today. For example, a  user on a dating website may want others to know what city he or she is located in. This user,  however, does not want any untrusted location sharing meaning that the user does not want  others on the dating website to know his or her specific address. Location, however, is very  important to the functionality of most dating applications and this information must be released  carefully. The obfuscation system described herein addresses this problem of how to release meaningful location information without  obfuscating it beyond reasonable usefulness. 

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 42% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

A Method of Obfuscating User Location During Untrusted Location Sharing 

Location sharing is becoming an important feature in a variety of social and mobile products.  Users want to annotate their social interactions and experiences with their location and location  sharing and annotating is quickly becoming a core component of social and mobile products. At  times, however, the users may not want others to know exactly where they are located. This  situation is further referred to as "untrusted location sharing." In these situations, a user may  want others to know the general area in which he or she is located, but does not want the public  to know their exact location. 

Untrusted location sharing is quite common in social and mobile products today. For example, a  user on a dating website may want others to know what city he or she is located in. This user,  however, does not want any untrusted location sharing meaning that the user does not want  others on the dating website to know his or her specific address. Location, however, is very  important to the functionality of most dating applications and this information must be released  carefully. On the one hand, it is important for prospective dates to know your general location so  they can decide whether your profile is worth investing the time, money, and resources needed  to travel to a location for a date. On the other hand, there are many people on the internet that  should not necessarily know where you live, dine, or work. The obfuscation system described  herein addresses this problem of how to release meaningful location information without  obfuscating it beyond reasonable usefulness. 

There exist a few methods to obfuscate a user's location. One such method involves "jittering"  the user's location, but this method can be overcome so that the user's location is known even if  the user does not want their location to be known. This "jittering" method can be rendered  useless by collecting samples of data which would allow someone to zero in on a user's actual  location against their wishes. In other words, "jittering" makes it more difficult to obtain a user's  exact location, but it does not render finding a user's exact location impossible. Thus, untrusted  location sharing can still occur if the "jittering" method is the only method used to obfuscate a  user's location. 

Another method involves attaching the user to a grid and approximating their location to a spot on  the grid, but this ignores the issue of the number of users who might occupy that...