Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

INFORMATION CATEGORIZATION FOR USERS WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS AND LIMITED ATTENTION SPAN

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236534D
Publication Date: 2014-May-01
Document File: 7 page(s) / 291K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Mauro Cherubini: AUTHOR

Abstract

User interfaces often use categories to organize information in different sets. Categories can  take many shapes and forms, but these are often suited more for normal sighted users. The idea described herein is a general purpose software library that can handle the translation of  information categories into vibro­tactile feedback. The basic principle of this system is to perform a sensorial substitution of information categories into tactile sequences. 

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 19% of the total text.

Page 01 of 7

INFORMATION CATEGORIZATION FOR USERS WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS AND  LIMITED ATTENTION SPAN 

 

User interfaces often use categories to organize information in different sets. Categories can  take many shapes and forms. For example, they can a) take the form of tags  which are 

1

non­hierarchical keywords that are associated to an item; b) take the form of containers (e.g.,  folders) in which information belonging to the same category is organized; c) take the form of a  different visual treatment that could be associated to information belonging to the same group  (e.g., colors); or d) take the form of other visual elements which could be associated to  information belonging to the same group (e.g., icons, or images). 
 
All of these solutions work great for normal sighted users. In fact, thanks to the ability of our  vision system to quickly scan an interface and focus attention on elements that present an  interesting pattern, we can readily use the categorization systems described above to select the  information we need.  
 
Unfortunately, users with visual impairments are often times unable to take advantage of these  categorization systems. These users often rely on screen readers  or magnifying glasses to 

2

access the user interface elements. This poses a number of challenges for the visually impaired  user. First, the screen reader reads the information in a sequential order and, although the user  can operate jumps between different sections, he or she cannot anticipate and scan the content  in the same manner a normal sighted user would. This results in an unequal efficiency in  accessing information. Another challenge that arises for the visually impaired is that the screen  readers cannot read non­textual content (e.g., images, graphs, etc.,). In order to read non­textual  information categories, the categories need to be associated to textual strings. Often times  applications are not accessible because elements such as these ones are not prepared for  screen readers. A final challenge posed on the visually impaired is that users with reduced sight  due to glaucoma or reduced attention span (due to attentional deficits or high cognitive load as  pilots) might also be incapacitated to take full advantage of the categorization systems described  above.  
 
Currently, there exist some technology to alleviate these problems and challenges posed on the  visually impaired. Some screen readers, for example, have advanced features such as locating  text displayed in a given color. This solution, however, may fall short for the follow...