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Methods for identifying physical expertise level and abilities for adaptation of systems, applications, content and devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236603D
Publication Date: 2014-May-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method for identifying physical expertise level and abilities for adaptation of systems, applications, content and devices is disclosed

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

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Methods for identifying physical expertise level and abilities for adaptation of systems , applications, content and devices

Disclosed is a method for identifying physical expertise level and abilities for adaptation of systems, applications, content and devices.

When someone participates in a sporting event, it would be beneficial for the person engaging in the activity to receive educational materials, advertisements, equipment rental suggestions that meet their physical form and capabilities. As an example, someone who is an expert playing golf may be more interested in receiving marketing literature for tournaments than someone who is struggling to hold their club or hit the ball consistently. Someone who is struggling to hit the golf ball may have a greater need for face-to-face interactive assistance from the putting green attendant. In a second example, children/students participating in a sport like basketball have different levels of skills. For those children/students, it would be helpful for coaches to be able to easily create teams with complementary skill levels when organizing the children into teams. It would also be helpful to understand how well factory workers are performing their jobs to determine the optimal set of person/machine combinations for a shift.

Currently, the ability to customize the experience is dependent upon a participant self-identifying their skill level or an expert interacting with the participant to make an educated evaluation of the needs of the participant. The problem with this approach is that it is inconsistent and, unless the expert subsequently adds their recommendations to a database, there is no ongoing memory of the person's physical ability or progress. Additionally, this process requires human intervention to enable adaptation of systems, applications, devices and content.

The disclosed method compares the movement of person engaging in a physical activity including interactions with objects to movements that indicate different levels of skill. The determined level of skill of the person engaging in the activity is provided to an application, system, content or device for adaptation based on the skill level.

This is an advantage over other systems because experts do not have to guess at the skill levels or intensity levels. Additionally, the simple notion of levels (high, medium, low) or (beginner, novice, expert), (1-10), etc. can easily be used as input to adaptive programs.

An example emb...