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Prioritisation of self-driving vehicles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000236869D
Publication Date: 2014-May-20
Document File: 3 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

As self-driving cars take to the road, the effort has been on making those vehicles behave the same as manually driven vehicles. When all/most cars are self-driving, more intelligence can be added to enable additional capabilities. One such capability could be the prioritisation of vehicles, where vehicles can decide their own priorities and interact with other vehicles in order to allow higher priority vehicles to be given priority on the road. The idea described in this article is to enable self-driving cars to calculate their own priorities, communicate that to other vehicles, and behave appropriately in response to other vehicles' priorities.

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Prioritisation of self-driving vehicles

As self-driving cars take to the road, the effort has been on making those vehicles behave the same as manually driven vehicles. When all/most cars are self-driving, more intelligence can be added to enable additional capabilities. One such capability could be the prioritisation of vehicles, where vehicles can decide their own

priorities and interact with other vehicles in order to allow higher priority vehicles to be given priority on the road.

    The idea described in this article is to enable self-driving cars to calculate their own priorities, communicate that to other vehicles, and behave appropriately in response to other vehicles' priorities.

Background

    Existing ideas include inter-vehicle communication and a form of prioritisation of emergency vehicles (http://www.issr-journals.org/xplore/ijias/IJIAS-13-086-02.pdf), and adding infrastructure to the roads to monitor traffic and adjust speeds to avoid congestion (http://www.ijcta.com/documents/volumes/vol3issue4/ijcta2012030441.pdf). Some of these ideas are complementary to the ideas in this article, and could be used together. The existing ideas deal with the most obvious case of emergency vehicles, but do not cover
the more subtle prioritisation of other vehicles
the automatic generation of priority based on a variety of data
the behaviour required of lower priority vehicle to enable higher priority vehicles the ability to propagate priorities along the queue of cars to avoid higher priority vehicles being held up behind lower priority vehicles
Description of idea

    This section describes how the idea works. Assume we have a priority range of 1 - 100, where 50 is normal, and 90+ is emergency. Every vehicle has the same default priority, as a starting point. Various factors can alter this:
Emergency Vehicle:

    If an emergency vehicle is put into emergency mode (i.e. the lights are switched on), then the priority is automatically set to 90. Optionally the emergency vehicle could be told (from the command centre) the nature of the emergency and the vehicle could increase the priority. For example a multi-car crash may be prioritised over a single car incident, or a motorway incident may be prioritised over a residential road incident, or a fire in a block of flats, or terraced house may be prioritised over a fire in detached property, etc. Potentially the driver of the emergency vehicle could also manually adjust the priority depending on the local traffic and other conditions.

Late Vehicles

    The car knows the destination (as it is driving there). It can estimate how long it will take to get there. If it also has access to the occupants calendars, it can find out if there is something particular occurring at the destination. For example, examining the calendars of the occupants of the vehicle shows that ther...