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USING NEARBY DEVICES FOR PHOTO GENERATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237040D
Publication Date: 2014-May-28
Document File: 9 page(s) / 166K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The system generally improves photos by combining preferred features of multiple related photos into a composite photo, where the composite photo includes all of the preferred features. For example, the system finds nearby devices and uses the photos from those nearby devices to generate an improved image of the same subject matter.

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USING NEARBY DEVICES FOR PHOTO GENERATION

ABSTRACT

      The system generally improves photos by combining preferred features of multiple related photos into a composite photo, where the composite photo includes all of the preferred features. For example, the system finds nearby devices and uses the photos from those nearby devices to generate an improved image of the same subject matter.

DESCRIPTION

      As described in more detail below, the system uses preferred portions of different photos taken by different cameras to provide a composite photo. For example, at a wedding, different people typically use their different cameras to take pictures of the bride and groom.

     FIG. 1 shows multiple cameras positioned nearby each other and positioned around the same scene (e.g., the bride and groom). These cameras capture multiple photos of the same scene. The system identifies which devices took images of the same scene. The cameras may synchronize with each other, in that they may locate each other and associate with each other. Also, the photographers using the cameras may join a shared event.

      FIG. 2 shows the system receiving various photos. Such photos may be of a bride and a groom, as in the example above. Some pictures may show only one of the bride and groom smiling. For example, the bride may be smiling but the groom is not smiling. Some pictures may show both the bride and groom smiling but one or more both may be blinking. As described in more detail below, the system takes the preferred features from the group of photos

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(e.g., smiles, open eyes, etc.) and combines them into a photo composite. As a result, in the composite photo, both the bride and the groom could be smiling with there eyes open.

      FIG. 3 shows another example, where a person is smiling (preferred feature) but has closed eyes. FIG. 4 shows an example, where the same person has open eyes (preferred feature) but is not smiling. The system recognizes facial features in the subject matter. For example, for a given face, the system may recognize the mouth, eyes, etc. The system then determines differences in the facial features from image to image (e.g., FIG. 3, FIG. 4, etc.) of the same subject matter. For example, the system may determine that the face has a smile in one photo (e.g., FIG. 3) but no smile in another photo (e.g., FIG. 4).

         The system determines a base photo. The system may select the base photo based on having generally good attributes. For example, the base photo may have good image qualities such being clear, having good brightness, etc. The base photo may have one or more aspects that are less desirable, such as have a mouth that is not smiling.

      The system may then identify a photo where the mouth of the same person is smiling, where the smile is desirable. The system may then extract the portion of the image (e.g., the smiling mouth) to replace the mouth that is not smiling. As indicated above, while the base photo may come from one camera, th...