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Predictive Memory Footprinting

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237203D
Publication Date: 2014-Jun-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and system through which average memory footprints of different applications are tracked and subsequently used to determine if a computer is likely to be able to open another application is disclosed.

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Predictive Memory Footprinting


Disclosed is a method and system through which average memory footprints of different applications are tracked and subsequently used to determine if a computer is likely to be able to open another application.

User's will have a number of applications open in their computing system. These applications consume a variable amount of memory, and it is often difficult to predict if the computer can handle another application opening without experiencing a significant degradation in performance. Currently there are no good ways of addressing this problem. Computers will just gradually degrade performance until they become almost unusable.

Disclosed is a method and system through which average memory footprints of different applications are tracked and subsequently used to determine if a computer is likely to be able to open another application
The method functions as follows:

As the user utilizes their computer in a normal fashion the operating system tracks all programs that are opened.

Any opened program has its memory footprint analyzed over the course of the time it is open.

This memory footprint is used to build an average memory footprint for each program that the user opens, as well as a maximum memory footprint - the highest memory footprint ever produced by the program.

As the user continues to use their computer, their aggregate average memory footprint for the sum of the open programs begins to approach the available memory of...