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Linear Multi-Component Selection And Feedback Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237317D
Publication Date: 2014-Jun-12
Document File: 3 page(s) / 399K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a novel holistic selection and feedback approach to facilitating user selections for a system upgrade. The method allows the user to know the selection options as well as the system requirements for a correct linear upgrade.

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Page 01 of 3

Linear Multi -

-Component Selection And Feedback Interface

Component Selection And Feedback Interface

The common method for selecting items from a long list is to use either check boxes or radio buttons. When a user needs to select multiple items, a check box is excellent for showing what is selectable and what is selected. When a user needs to be constrained to a single choice, a radio button is a better option. However, a user currently cannot select a component with prerequisite components (e.g., a Hardware Upgrade Change Plan). This selection problem was discovered when giving users control of how far to upgrade a system. Check boxes could work, but would require many more clicks to deselect components the user does not want. A radio button would work better as the user is constrained to choosing the last component to be acted upon (i.e. updated). However, a radio button selects only one component and visual aids are necessary to tell the user that the components before it have to be selected with it.

Figure 1: One radio button selected and required components shown

Figure 2: One radio button selected and required components shown

The solution is a novel holistic selection and feedback approach. The method allows the user to know the selection options as well as the system requirements for a correct linear upgrade.

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Page 02 of 3

When selecting between different steps of a linear setup process, the user interface constrains the user from making mistakes and provides feedback in a table and in a linear bar graph showing what step is done, what step is selected, what steps are left to be done, and any steps in error. The user can then immediately see what components are selected when clicking a radio button in the change plan table as well as a time estimation bar. Not only does this constrain the user from making upgrade selection mistakes, it...