Browse Prior Art Database

Fingerprint Swipe Sensor and Button Layout

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237347D
Publication Date: 2014-Jun-13
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Mohamed Sheik-Nainar: INVENTOR

Abstract

Biometric sensors, including fingerprint area and placement sensors, in mobile devices (phones, tablets, phablets, readers, and other devices) can be placed in a variety of surfaces on the mobile devices, including the back of the device. For example, some devices include a physical button adjacent to, or part of, a swipe type biometric sensor on the back side of a device. Such a placement may improve aesthetics of the device or the mechanical design of other components. At the same time, such placement may complicate user interaction because the use is “blind” – the user cannot directly see the sensor location. However, the user experience is enhanced and fingerprint sensor authentication and usability improved through careful design of this sensor and button area layout. As described below, the process and fidelity of a biometric sensor on the back of a device (e.g. opposite a main display) can be improved compared to current implementations.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

Fingerprint Swipe Sensor and Button Layout

Mohamed Sheik-Nainar

Fingerprint Swipe Sensor and Button Layout


1. Inventor: Mohamed Sheik-Nainar

2. Synaptics Incorporated, San Jose, CA, USA


3. Short Summary

Dimple for swipe start location

Button

Hinge

Figure 1

Biometric sensors, including fingerprint area and placement sensors, in mobile devices (phones, tablets, phablets, readers, and other devices) can be placed in a variety of surfaces on the mobile devices, including the back of the device. For example, some devices include a physical button adjacent to, or part of, a swipe type biometric sensor on the back side of a device. Such a placement may improve aesthetics of the device or the mechanical design of other components. At the same time, such placement may complicate user interaction because the use is "blind" - the user cannot directly see the sensor location. However, the user experience is enhanced and fingerprint sensor authentication and usability improved through careful design of this sensor and button area layout. As described below, the process and fidelity of a biometric sensor on the back of a device (e.g. opposite a main display) can be improved compared to current implementations.


4. Some Problems Solved

Examples of some of the problems addressed by the invention include:

Copyright © 2014 Synaptics Incorporated, All Rights Reserved.

Page: 1 of 2

Information contained in this publication is provided as-is, with no express or implied warranties, including any warranty of merchantability, fitness for any particular purpose, or non-infringement. Synaptics Incorporated assumes no liability whatsoever for any use of the information contained herein, including any liability for intellectual property infringement. This publication conveys no express or implied licenses to any intellectual property rights belonging to Synaptics or any other party. Synaptics may, from time to time and at its sole option, update the information contained herein without notice.


Page 02 of 2

Fingerprint Swipe Sensor and Button Layout

Some mobile devices include a fingerprint sensor on the back of a device. For example, the left side of Figure 1 shows an exemplary mobile phone having a swipe fingerprint sensor on the back. The fingerprint sensor may be integrated into, or placed adjacent to, a button that causes the device to wake and sleep. Using this and similar layouts, authentication is process of locating the button through purely feel, pressing the button to wake the device, and swiping a finger over the fingerprint sensor. A problem arises if the swipe motion is too forceful. The swipe can cause the button to be pressed again resulting in the device entering a sleep state while attempting to authenticate a finger. This situation may occur regardless of whether the fingerprint sensor is built into or adjacent to the sleep/wake button.

The proposed solution not only simplifies the user interaction for authenticating into the system but ca...