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Buried node with wire for recovery/antenna

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237585D
Publication Date: 2014-Jun-25
Document File: 4 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The best operating condition for a land seismic sensor, in order to minimize ambient noise pick-up and to optimize the coupling with the soil, is to be buried below the surface. Burying the sensor unit is routinely done on cabled systems, the cable coming out of the ground between adjacent sensors being used to localize and recover the buried sensor unit. In the case of a nodal system, there is by definition no cable between sensor units. Burying the sensor unit introduces the risk of losing it, as nothing would be visible at the surface. Nodal units are also often too voluminous to be buried efficiently, in part because of the battery need to operate over a sufficient period of time. Burial also make any radio communication, either for data transmission, synchronization or positioning (wireless, GPS) challenging, due to attenuation through the soil. Solutions have been proposed to these issues, separating the nodal unit in two parts: a unit at the surface controlling a sensor buried next to it. This is causing increased complexity and cost to the nodal unit.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 01 of 4

Page 1 of 4

Title of Invention: Buried node with wire for recovery/antenna

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Field: land nodal seismic acquisition.

The best operating condition for a land seismic sensor, in order to minimize ambient noise pick-up and to optimize the coupling with the soil, is to be buried below the surface.

Burying the sensor unit is routinely done on cabled systems, the cable coming out of the ground between adjacent sensors being used to localize and recover the buried sensor unit.

In the case of a nodal system, there is by definition no cable between sensor units. Burying the sensor unit introduces the risk of losing it, as nothing would be visible at the surface. Nodal units are also often too voluminous to be buried efficiently, in part because of the battery need to operate over a sufficient period of time. Burial also make any radio communication, either for data transmission, synchronization or positioning (wireless, GPS) challenging, due to attenuation through the soil.

Solutions have been proposed to these issues, separating the nodal unit in two parts: a unit at the surface controlling a sensor buried next to it. This is causing increased complexity and cost to the nodal unit.


Page 02 of 4

Page 2 of 4

In this invention, we propose an integrated nodal unit, with all functions in a single housing, to be buried below the surface, with a wire connected to it, which end is left at the surface.

The wire is used to locate the sensor unit for retrieval, and can be used to pull the sensor unit out of the ground (even if you try to tell people not too pull, it will be done so you might as well plan for it)

This wire can also be used as antenna for a GPS or for wireless data transmission, or as a cable connecting to such an antenna.

Related ART

   HP node patent application WO 2012/118477 A1
Box at the surface with battery, antenna (control unit) connected by cable to a small buried sensor unit.

 Fairfield wireless node application


Box at the surface with antenna and battery wirelessly connected to a small buried sensor unit.

DESCRIPTION

Nodal units includes:

S...