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Method and System for Providing Persistent Network File System Client-ID Opaque Strings using a No Hash Collision Directory Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237631D
Publication Date: 2014-Jun-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and system is disclosed for providing persistent Network File System (NFS) client-ID opaque strings using a no hash collision directory structure.

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Method and System for Providing Persistent Network File System Client-ID Opaque Strings using a No Hash Collision Directory Structure
Disclosed is a method and system for providing persistent Network File System (NFS) client-ID opaque strings using a no hash collision directory structure. In one embodiment, the method and system utilizes an algorithm to provide a persistent Network File System-4 (NFS4) protocol for client-ID opaque strings. The algorithm performs operations to store any opaque client-ID that is longer than a preset file size. The algorithm performs the operations by avoiding the usage of hash functions, thereby eliminating hash collisions in directory structures.

In accordance with the method and system, the algorithm splits the opaque client-id string into one or more segments with each of the one or more segments exceeding up to a maximum permitted file size. Thereafter the algorithm creates a directory hierarchy based on the information obtained from the one or more of split segments. Further, when a client-ID needs to be restored after a storage crash recovery, the algorithm simply traverses through the directory hierarchy and restores the appropriate client-id by concatenating and validating the format of the one or more of split segments.

In a scenario, the algorithm initially determines length of an opaque client-ID string and a token is prepended for constructing a single length string. Thereafter, the constructed string is split into one or more segments with each of the one or more segments exceeding up to a maximum permitted file size. Alternatively, the algorithm checks the size of each of the one or more segments and exceeds the size to a maximum file size if the initial size of any of the segments is identified to be lesser than the maximum defined size.

Consider an exemplary scenario, where a maximum file size is previously set to 4. The algorithm is then implemented to split a single length constructed string such as, for example, aaaabbbbcccceeee, into segments such as, 16 - a aaab bbbc ccce eee. The algorithm then utili...