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Reliable Zero-Leak Check Valves Cartridges for ALS Seal Sections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237681D
Publication Date: 2014-Jul-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 109K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Present valves are leaking, and this leads to Seal Section contamination, which in conjunction with equipment thermal cycles leads to motor contamination and ultimately, to motor failure. The goal was to change valve features that are preventing a reliable operation, both at standard and at extreme operating conditions. The invention focus on the robust design and the location of valve moving parts, to place them in a clean environment to prevent the clogging and locking that results in a non-sealed situation. To prevent obstruction and blockages, tight tolerance sliding pieces are avoided, and a large diameter spring is placed in the clean portion of the cartridge. In addition, larger flow cross-sections guarantee that pressure equalization is achieved at a relative faster pace. The new valves retrofit available cartridge envelope. Present valves leak because: • The spring and poppet work flooded in well fluid. Well fluid debris and high viscosity inhibit close-tolerance parts movement, hampering shutting effectiveness. • The seat O-Ring placed on valve body swells and deform at operating conditions, not offering a neat surface for the poppet to seal. The proposed valve sketched in the attachment accomplishes with the following features: • The Spring is located in the clean-oil filled cavity, keeping from the very beginning the moving parts away from direct well debris. • In the long run some bitumen and solids would migrate to the interior of the first cartridge. To prevent them from obstructing the valve movements: • the moving parts don’t have tight clearances, and • the spring is as large as possible for the available room. • To ease the construction, the zero-leak seal is achieved by an O-Ring located on the poppet. The elastomer must be carefully selected to operate at well conditions. • To speed the time necessary for seal pressure equalization, internal valve cross sections are increased, allowing a higher oil flow rate. One alternative design done on a valve similar to the present one (where the spring works on the well fluid chamber), will be to change the floating element, from a Hollow Poppet to a Ball. With this design, the inconvenience of the close-tolerance poppet is circumvent because the versatility of a ball, which allows 3D movements and seats in all its surface. The ball shape and movement also allows for some seat O-Ring deformation. Another alternative that can be done on both type of designs (spring on the clean chamber and on the wellfluid chamber) is to change the closure seal, from an elastomeric O-Ring to a high-temperature material Seat (PEEK, Fluoropolymer, metal, etc). The advantage will be the stability (non-deformation and/or damage) of the seats at high temperatures and/or in presence of gas and/or chemicals that usually affect and damage elastomers. The effectiveness of the new design will be monitored. If it doesn’t meet our needs, further enhancements will be necessary and pursued. At this time I can foresee doing some of the following: • Decrease the amount of radial freedom of the Stem Poppet introducing O.D. guides to the Spring Aligner. • Limit the Stem Poppet axial movement at entrance and exit. • Add an extra sealing surface (adjacent to the o-ring) to seat/seal onto the body. • Add a second sealing o-ring to the Poppet or to the body. • Replace the cost effective crimped union between Stem and Spring Aligner with a precision machined tread. • The materials and design used for the zero-leak seal must be reviewed and improved to guarantee reliable operation at standard conditions as well at 540 ºF, in contact with bitumen and water, and resisting gas explosive decompression. To solve this array of different requirements, more than one material and/or seats configuration may be required.

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Reliable Zero-Leak Check Valves Cartridges for ALS Seal Sections

Present valves are leaking, and this leads to Seal Section contamination, which in conjunction with equipment thermal cycles leads to motor contamination and ultimately, to motor failure. The goal was to change valve features that are preventing a reliable operation, both at standard and at extreme operating conditions. The invention focus on the robust design and the location of valve moving parts, to place them in a clean environment to prevent the clogging and locking that results in a non-sealed situation. To prevent obstruction and blockages, tight tolerance sliding pieces are avoided, and a large diameter spring is placed in the clean portion of the cartridge. In addition, larger flow cross-sections guarantee that pressure equalization is achieved at a relative faster pace. The new valves retrofit available cartridge envelope.

Present valves leak because: • The spring and poppet work flooded in well fluid. Well fluid debris and high viscosity inhibit close-tolerance parts movement, hampering shutting effectiveness. • The seat O-Ring placed on valve body swells and deform at operating conditions, not offering a neat surface for the poppet to seal. The proposed valve sketched in the attachment accomplishes with the following features: • The Spring is located in the clean-oil filled cavity, keeping from the very beginning the moving parts away from direct well debris. • In the long run some bitumen and solids would migrate to the interior of the first cartridge. To prevent them from obstructing the valve movements: • the moving parts don’t have tight clearances, and • the spring is as large as possible for the available room. • To ease the construction, the zero-leak seal is achieved by an O-Ring located on the poppet. The elastomer must be carefully selected to operate at well conditions. • To speed the time necessary for seal pressure equalization, internal valve cross sections are increased, allowing a higher oil flow rate.

One alternative design done on a...