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MERGING PHOTOS FROM DIFFERENT LOCATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237850D
Publication Date: 2014-Jul-16
Document File: 5 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The system generally improves organization of photos by merging photos. For example, the system combines photos from different locations into a single view. Such locations or sources may be local (e.g., at a local device) or remote (e.g., at an online account).

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MERGING PHOTOS FROM DIFFERENT LOCATIONS

ABSTRACT

      The system generally improves organization of photos by merging photos. For example, the system combines photos from different locations into a single view. Such locations or sources may be local (e.g., at a local device) or remote (e.g., at an online account).

DESCRIPTION

      FIG. 1 shows multiple locations where photos might by stored. For example, photos can be stored at a local source such as on a device. Photos can also be stored at a remote source such as online at an account. The local source shown can represent different local sources, and the remote source shown can represent different remote sources.

      Such sources may include, for example, one or more local photo libraries on a phone, tablet, and/or computer; one or more local file systems on a phone, tablet, and/or computer; one or more online photo accounts; one or more email accounts; one or more instant messaging accounts; one or more photos tagged of another user in other user's accounts, etc.

      To merge the photos, the system scans the various sources for photos. As described in more detail below, the system merges different images from local sources and remote source such that the photos are viewed by a user together in a single view, as opposed to being viewed in separate contexts. A benefit of the single view is that the user need not press a button in order to toggle to different storage locations to view photos. The system may present the photos in any configuration such as in a grid view.

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     The system may include one or more synchronizers. As the system scans and synchronizes with each source, the system may perform various actions. For example, the system may read the image bytes for each photo. The system may also compute a cryptographic hash (e.g., SHA-1, etc.) of each photo. The system may also compute a perceptual hash of each photo.

     The system may also read other metadata from each photo. Such metadata may include timestamp, faces present, image size, places, location, objects present, etc. The system may also use each of the above metadata to construct a "photo version" object, where the photo version object includes a summary of this known version of the photo. The system may also report the photo version object for each photo to a "photo index." The system may report the photo version object for each photo to a photo index immediately or at a later time.

     A photo version object could include various information. For example, a photo version object could include a cryptographic hash, a time stamp when image was taken, a timestamp when image was edited, a uniform resource locator (URL) to an image, etc. The URL could indicate where the image is located whether online, local, or elsewhere. The photo version object can also include objects such as faces and people in the photo, as well as other information about objects in the photo. The photo version object can also include location information.

     The...