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A Microfluidic Point of Care Device Integrated with an Irradiation Source for Performing Immunological Tests on a Single Chip

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237899D
Publication Date: 2014-Jul-18
Document File: 6 page(s) / 175K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a microfluidic Point of Care (PoC) device integrated with an irradiation source to perform multiple biological experiments or immunological tests on a single credit card-sized chip.

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A Microfluidic Point of Care Device Integrated with an Irradiation Source for Performing Immunological Tests on a Single Chip

Disclosed is a microfluidic Point of Care (PoC) device with an integrated irradiation source to perform multiple biological experiments or immunological tests on a single chip.

Fig. 1 illustrates a top view of a microfluidic chip.

Figure 1

As shown in fig. 1, pointer 2 indicates a filtering or a focusing element that is connected

with a micro channel and pointer 1 indicates an image sensor that is integrated within the focusing or the filtering element. Further, pointer 3 indicates an image output to electronics.

Fig. 2 illustrates a scenario of utilizing one of a Light Emitting Diode (LED) and an Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) that is integrated with one of a light guiding structure or a waveguide structure inside the microchannel.

Figure 2

As shown in fig. 2, the microchannel includes several layers out of which the bottom-most layer represents a silicon (Si) layer. Here, the microchannel is integrated in a microfluidic chip. The layer on top of the Si layer is a silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer and the layer on top of the SiO2 layer is a tantalum pentaoxide (Ta2O5) waveguide.

Here, one of the LED and the OLED emits a light shown in orange color and is powered

with a planar electrode. The one of the LED and the OLED is turned on after a biological reaction in the PoC device. The red circles or spheres represent fluorescent dye particles. Fluorescent dyes absorb light and re-emit it at a slightly longer

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wavelength (lower energy). Fluorescent dyes are often used to help detect a biological reaction and perform a diagnosis. The orange arrows representing the light emitted by one of the LED and the OLED is guided by the Ta 2O5 waveguide, where the light leaks into a sample channel that is shown in blue color. The orange light leaked through the interface between the waveguide and the sample channel radiates at the wavelength required to excite the fluorescent dyes and constitutes the excitation light . The fluorescent dyes then absorb part of the excitation light and re -emit it as fluorescence light at a different wavelength represented as red arrows in Fig. 2. Detection of the excited fluorescent radiation requires very sharp filters to separate it from the excitation radiation with high signal to noise ratio. The layer deposited on top of the sample channel is a cover layer shown in sky blue color and is used to cover the microfluidic chip. As shown in fig.2, the top-most black color layer represents a camera, the green color layer represents lens of the camera and the light brown color represents a filter . Here, the filter is used to block light at the excitation wavelength while passing light at the fluorescent wavelength propagating at 90 degrees.

Fig. 3 illustrates a wave mode excitation.

As shown in fig. 3, wavelengths used in the wave mode excitation are used to efficiently couple t...