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Tracking Service to provide real time progress of session replay, search capability of past session replay, and one click view of replay health report

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000237995D
Publication Date: 2014-Jul-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a tracking service that provides a real time view of the progress of a Customer Experience Management (CEM) software session replay, a search capability of a past session replay, and a one-click view of a replay health report.

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Tracking Service to provide real time progress of session replay, search capability of past session replay, and one click view of replay health report

Current Customer Experience Management (CEM) software does not allow each component to perform an independent log. If an issue occurs, a user cannot view what

when wrong or what was happening when the issue occurred.

The novel contribution is a service that allows the user to monitor real time progress of a CEM session replay and create an overall replay health report with user-selected criteria.

The service creates a separate Representational State Transfer (REST)FUL web service to handle logging information for all the software components at the CEM software replay. The components and process follow.

On the client:

1. CEM software modules send logging information to tracking service via Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)


2. Logging information needs to abide by a common data schema


3. A logging information consumer can query the service with specific constraints

(e.g., data source, time range, session, severity, etc.) via HTTP

On the service:


1. The service can be hosted by an Internet Information Service (IIS), windows

service, or stand alone executable (self-hosting)

2. Logging information is held in memory at first. When a session is complete (or timed-out), data is written to a file (possibly a database in the future)

3. At most x (e.g., 1000) complete session logging data can be held in memory 4. When a que...