Browse Prior Art Database

Inferred context network protocol for minimal bandwidth usage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238129D
Publication Date: 2014-Aug-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This publication describes the invention of a simple protocol for minimal data exchange. This is achieved by adding context to a conversation. Applications include querying if a value has reached a set threshold. As part of the current trend concept of an "Internet of Things", you might have, for example, one small device (or sensor) that is responsible for monitoring some variable system, and another system that checks whether this property has passed a set threshold value.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

Inferred context network protocol for minimal bandwidth usage

As part of the current trend concept of an "Internet of Things", you might have, for example, one small device (or sensor) that is responsible for monitoring some variable system, and another system that checks whether this property has passed a set threshold value.

    The sensors could be measuring anything, but one example might be how full a rainwater collector is: it may not be necessary to know how full the collector is, only when it's nearly at capacity.

    Embedded systems, sensors, and other devices that comprise the Internet of Things may want to minimise the network traffic to obtain this information. Furthermore, there may be several variables or monitored systems for which the status is queried. This publication presents a novel inquiry mechanism, using minimal memory, since we believe quick status checking is a common task that warrants its own simple protocol.

    Existing solutions involve more verbose network traffic, which may not be desired for these newer, smaller systems of devices. Alternatively, a pub/sub architecture can solve many of these problems, but such an architecture is not always possible, for a variety of reasons.

    Modal conversations are implicitly set up, without the need of an additional handshake part of the protocol, for the simple but common use case of inquiring of the status of a variable.

    Two nodes, A and B, are talking to each other on the network (for example, using the IBM MQ Telemetry Transport (MQTT) protocol (or other "light weight" messaging point-to-point protocol)).

    In the example in Figure 1 below, node B is monitoring a variable x, and node A wants to periodically inquire as to its value. Node A first asks what the value of x is, which node B returns. From then on, this conversation is implicitly modal, in that all further questions and answers are assumed by both nodes to be about variable x. Since this is the case, the network bandwidth can be reduced. (An implementation woul...