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Method to detect & capture arcing for high potential test in a manufacturing environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238131D
Publication Date: 2014-Aug-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for capturing electrical arcs generated inside a device while undergoing a high potential (hi-pot) test, processing sound information as an arcing event detection method.

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Method to detect &

&& capture arcing for high potential test in a manufacturing

             capture arcing for high potential test in a manufacturing environment

During system manufacturing tests, high potential power testing of the systems is conducted for safety reasons. When a fail occurs during testing, an electrical arc and sound are produced. Knowing the source of that arc and sound during hi-pot test is very important information to complete valuable failure analysis of the hardware. This system describes a method on how to capture these sparks arc and sound automatically and reliably in a manufacturing test environment. Data is recorded with several cameras and a spark is detected by identifying a distinctive 'pop' sound.

    Disclosed is a system for capturing electrical arcs generated inside a device while undergoing a high potential (hi-pot) test, processing sound information as an arcing event detection method. In normal manufacturing hi-pot test, sometimes, the system under test (SUT) encounters a 'pop' sound when the high voltage is applied. The pop sound, itself, does warrant further investigation and is thought to be an electric arc discharge. The smell of the board confirms that a discharge took place. However, as no one is allowed in the hi-pot zone, no one has ever observed the discharge whether inside or outside the unit. The arc event is triggered by sound. But it is not possible to start recording the event after the sound has occurred as the sound travels slower than light.

    The method of processing sound as a trigger point is computationally cheaper especially when we consider large volumes of data. Furthermore, it is not necessary to investigate how the flash looks like, but only to identify the location where the flash occurred so that additional insulation can be...