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Biological Signals To Influence Recommendation Engine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238498D
Publication Date: 2014-Aug-28
Document File: 5 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Recommendation engines, such as search engines, may recommend websites and/or content to a user. The recommendation engines make take into account biological signals, such as facial expressions, gazes, blood pressure, and/or heart rate, in determining user preferences and/or making recommendations.

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Biological Signals To Influence Recommendation Engine

ABSTRACT

Recommendation engines, such as search engines, may recommend websites and/or content to a user. The recommendation engines make take into account biological signals, such as facial expressions, gazes, blood pressure, and/or heart rate, in determining user preferences and/or making recommendations.

    Recommendation engines, such as search engines, may provide recommendations to users, such as recommending websites and/or content. When making a recommendation, the recommendation engines may consider current signals provided by the user such as browsing input including keyboard input (e.g. search terms) and/or mouse input (selections), and/or from the user's computing device including location and/or time. The recommendation engine may also consider preferences of the user. The preferences of the user may be determined based on past activities of the user, such as past searches and/or selections and how long the user has interacted with certain pages. Then, the recommendation engine can make recommendations to the user based on the signals provided by the user and the preferences of the user.

    User's preferences and/or interests may change based on the state of the user himself or herself. For example, if the user is hungry, then the user may be more interested in restaurants. If the user is sad, then the user may be interested in being cheered up by trusted friends or family members. Therefore, to address these temporary changes in the user's preferences and/or interests, it is proposed to consider biological signals, based on the user himself or herself, in providing recommendations.

    FIG. 1 is a diagram of a system for recommending content. The system may include a recommendation engine 102. The recommendation engine 102 may recommend content, such as websites, to a user. The recommendation engine 102 may recommend content based on received


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signals 104 and stored preferences 106. The received signals 104 may be associated with a request for content, and the stored preferences 106 may be associated with a user making the request for recommendations.

    The signals 104 may be sent to the recommendation engine by the user's device, which may include a personal computer, a laptop or notebook computer, or smartphone. The signals 104 may include browsing information 108, which may be received via a keyboard and/or a mouse. The browsing information 108 may include, for example, a search term presented via the keyboard, and/or selections made by mouse clicks.

    The signals 104 may also include information provided by the computer 110. The information provided by the computer 110 may include, for example, a location of the user and/or computer, a time of the request, and/or a type (e.g. personal computer, laptop computer, or smartphone) or identity of the device.

    The signals 104 may also include biological signals 112. The biological signals 112 may include biometric info...