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Automatic Adjustment of Volume in Response to External Noise and Speech

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238562D
Publication Date: 2014-Sep-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method for automatic adjustment of volume in response to external noise and speech is disclosed.

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Automatic Adjustment of Volume in Response to External Noise and Speech

Disclosed is a method for automatic adjustment of volume in response to external noise and speech.

This disclosed method could detect speech and other forms of desirable audio and adjust the volume of a device accordingly. For example, this would allow a user who is listening to loud music to hear a ringing phone or another person who begins speaking to the user, instead of the speaker or phone being drowned out by the music.

The primary use for the method would be in consumer devices such as radios, portable music players, televisions, phones, and other electronics that provide audio to a user. The ambient noise in a user's environment may fluctuate greatly and rapidly, making it difficult for the user to hear audio from the device at an appropriate level. This can be for multiple reasons. Examples include loud background noise that drowns out the desired audio, important speech that cannot be heard over the audio, and a quiet environment in which the audio stands out and is distracting or disturbing to others in the vicinity. Often, it is difficult for the user to adjust volume to compensate for environmental effects. This is especially so when the environment changes rapidly.

Another application would be automatic adjustment of multiple audio levels that are expected to match, or have a certain balance. For example, if an interview is conducted and each speaking party has their own microphone, it would usually be preferable for a listening party to hear all speaking parties at an equal volume level, which could be detected and corrected.

Both hardware (micr...