Browse Prior Art Database

Varicose vein sclerosants (e.g. sotradecol and polidocanol) for nonsurgical sterilization in males

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238654D
Publication Date: 2014-Sep-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Elaine Lissner: AUTHOR

Related Documents

IPCOM000223843D: IP.COM

Abstract

Calcium chloride solution has been injected into the epididymis (the storage and maturation area for sperm) for hormone-sparing sterilization in animals (see “Epididymal injection of calcium chloride dihydrate solution (preferably in alcohol) for nonsurgical sterilization in males” for a list of citations). Other solutions have been injected epididymally as well (for example, 3% chlorhexidine in dogs, Pineda MH 1981). This prior art declaration proposes that foaming sclerosants may work even better, and should be tested alongside calcium chloride/alcohol solution and chlorhexidine in future studies of this approach.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 01 of 1

Varicose vein sclerosants (e.g. sotradecol and polidocanol) for nonsurgical sterilization in males

Prior art declaration, Parsemus Foundation, USA, September 9, 2014

Calcium chloride solution has been injected into the epididymis (the storage and maturation area for sperm) for hormone-sparing sterilization in animals (see "Epididymal injection of calcium chloride dihydrate solution (preferably in alcohol) for nonsurgical sterilization in males" for a list of citations). Other solutions have been injected epididymally as well (for example, 3% chlorhexidine in dogs, Pineda MH 1981). This prior art declaration proposes that foaming sclerosants may work even better, and should be tested alongside calcium chloride/alcohol solution and chlorhexidine in future studies of this approach.

20-30% calcium chloride by weight in pure ethyl alcohol is in recent years proving to be an effective sterilant and neutering agent for cats and dogs when injected intratesticularly, which both eliminates sperm production and reduces or eliminates testosterone production (for more information, see publications by Koger LM 1977/1978; Samanta PK and Jana K; and Leoci R 2014 in press; and/or links at ParsemusFoundation.org). However, there remains a need for a nonsurgical alternative to vasectomy, for both humans and animals. To substitute for vasectomy in humans, a sterilant would need to leave hormones intact. And eliminating hormones in other animals changes behaviors in ways that are not desirable in some situations. For example, hormones are thought to be key to maintaining social standing in wild horses; and in large and giant-breed dogs, lo...