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RUNNING A NETWORK DEVICE OPERATING SYSTEM VIRTUALLY TO CONTROL OPERATING SYSTEM PLATFORMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238668D
Publication Date: 2014-Sep-10
Document File: 4 page(s) / 159K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Sami Boutros: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Presented herein are techniques to run features available on one or more operating systems on the same hardware platform. For example, a first operating system (OS-1) controls the wide area network (WAN) core side interfaces, while a second operating system (OS-2) controls the Data Center/Enterprise interfaces.

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RUNNING A NETWORK DEVICE OPERATING SYSTEM VIRTUALLY TO CONTROL OPERATING SYSTEM PLATFORMS

AUTHORS:

 Sami Boutros Rex Fernando Yuri Tsier Reshad Rahman

Parag Jain

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    Presented herein are techniques to run features available on one or more operating systems on the same hardware platform. For example, a first operating system (OS-1) controls the wide area network (WAN) core side interfaces, while a second operating system (OS-2) controls the Data Center/Enterprise interfaces.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    The networking industry has developed over the years with a focus on three different networks/markets: Data Center (DC), Enterprise and Service Provider. At the interconnect of these networks, there is a need for two hardware platforms with the features associated with each network. For example, at an interconnect with a Data Center, a first vendor routing stack operating system (OS) and a second vendor routing stack OS are needed, with the first vendor routing stack OS (OS-1) implementing the Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS) wide area network (WAN) features and the second vendor routing stack OS (OS-2) implementing the DC side functions.

    Presented herein are techniques to run features available on one or more OS's on the same hardware platform. For example, OS-1 controls the WAN core side interfaces, while OS-2 controls the DC/Enterprise interfaces.

    Reference is made to FIGs. 1 and 2 below. There is a hardware (HW) platform having two sets of interfaces, one set facing, for example, the core side and one set facing, for example, the DC/Enterprise side.

Copyright 2014 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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FIG. 1

FIG. 2

    In FIG. 1, OS-1 runs as a virtual machine (VM)/Linux Container (LXC) within the context of OS-2. In FIG. 2, OS-1 runs as a VM on a separate server.

    One way this may be achieved is as follows. The L2/L3 interface configuration for all interfaces facing the core side is passed/mapped to the OS-1 VM virtual interfaces. All control packets on core facing interfaces are directed to/from OS-1. The OS-1

Copyright 2014 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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control plane would be running in a VM context and would be providing WAN protocols, such as the Internal Gateway Protocol (IGP), Resource Reservation Protocol - Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE), MPLS-Label Distribution Protocol (MPLS-LDP), MPLS-TE, Layer-2 Virtual Private Network (L2VPN), L3VPN, BGP and MPLS VPN functions. OS-2 would still map the interfaces facing the DC or Enterprise for example, and would be running its control plane in the DC/Enterprise, including Carrier Ethernet, Cisco VxLAN, Overlay Transport Virtualization (OTV), Cisco FabricPathâ„¢, etc., for example.

    Routes computed by OS-1 control plane RIB (L2/L3) and...