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BLUETOOTH PROXIMITY TRACKER FOR CYCLISTS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238899D
Publication Date: 2014-Sep-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system that compensates for the lack of visibility experienced by operators of large vehicles as a result of their vehicle’s blind spots and poor lighting conditions, in order to prevent accidents involving vulnerable road users like cyclists. The system uses a Bluetooth Low Energy emitter integrated into the chassis of a bicycle that constantly produces a signal while active, and an array of Bluetooth sensors integrated into the body of a large vehicle. When the cyclist comes within a defined radius of the large vehicle, the Bluetooth sensors in the body of the vehicle would determine the proximity of the cyclist relative to the large vehicle and display this information to the operator of the large vehicle using a smartphone application.

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BLUETOOTH PROXIMITY TRACKER FOR CYCLISTS

Safety for cyclists and motorcyclists is a subject familiar to most people. Current solutions for improving cyclist safety on the road focus on increasing awareness and visibility, including high visibility equipment, awareness adverts and road signs reminding motorists to look out for cyclists while driving. However, these solutions are ineffective if the driver of a vehicle fails to see the cyclist, especially when they are not in the driver's line of sight.

    A survey of 17,629 drivers conducted by the AA found that up to 93% of motorists say it is sometimes hard to see cyclists while driving, and 55% of motorists are 'surprised when a cyclist appears from nowhere'. 1

    Blind spots for the majority of cars are relatively small, however large vehicles such as busses and heavy-goods vehicles (HGVs) tend to have much larger blind spots, and as a result are less able to pre-emptively react to a dangerous situation involving a cyclist if they cannot see them.

    The proposed idea aims to compensate for this lack of visibility experienced by large vehicles due to their blind spots to help prevent accidents that could otherwise result in injury or death to vulnerable road users like cyclists.

[1] First paragraph, AA 'Think Bikes!' campaign launch article http://www.theaa.com/aa-charitable-trust/think-bikes-campaign.html

    The core idea is to compensate for the lack of visibility experienced particularly by large vehicles due to their blind spots by using Bluetooth Low Energy technology to determine the proximity of a cyclist relative to the vehicle, and displaying this information to the driver of the vehicle using a smartphone application.

    Simply, the idea would work by having a Bluetooth Low Energy emitter integrated into the chassis of a bicycle that constantly produces a signal while active, and an array of Bluetooth sensors integrated into the body of a large vehicle. When the cyclist comes within a defined radius of the large vehicle, the Bluetooth sensors in the body of the vehicle would determine the proximity of the cyclist relative to the large vehicle and display this information to the driver of the large vehicle using a smartphone application.

    The primary benefit of using this idea instead of existing solutions is that it provides motorists with an opportunity to sense cyclists where they would otherwise be unable to see them as...