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A system for automatically assessing personal appearance

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000238903D
Publication Date: 2014-Sep-24
Document File: 4 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Wearable computing is becoming increasingly ubiquitous and technology is now sufficiently advanced to assist in providing a quantitative assessment of the impact of a user's personal appearance. This article outlines a system for performing this type of assessment by using a wearable camera to detect the gaze direction of other people observing the user and calculating dynamic heat maps. Analyses of these heat maps can provide quantitative measures of the impact of appearance changes or alert the user to potentially embarrassing appearance issues.

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A system for automatically assessing personal appearance

Disclosed is a system to assist in providing a quantitative assessment of the impact of a user's personal appearance by using a wearable camera to detect the gaze direction of other people observing the user and calculating dynamic heat maps. Analyses of these heat maps can provide quantitative measures of the impact of appearance changes or alert the user to potentially embarrassing appearance issues.

    Some people and organisations place a particular emphasis on their personal appearance for example airlines often impose strict appearance requirements on flight attendants and many celebrities trade on their image and style. These people face two problems: i) their style reputation is easily tarnished by, for example, an appearance mishap and ii) assessing the impact of their style is difficult to quantify in order to make improvements and thus for example increase their celebrity or desirability as a spokesperson.

    These problems can also apply in a less business impacting way to most people, for example if they didn't know that they had dropped food on clothing or had a wardrobe malfunction of some kind.

    Current approaches to assessing current appearance are to frequently look in a mirror or take a picture/selfies to check on appearance oneself. Alternatively asking other people or personal stylists to assess one's appearance. These approaches are effective, but require a conscious and manual action to perform a check, which is easily overlooked or is not the highest priority. Additionally there is no easy way to compare appearance between two dates or times in terms of impact without consulting a panel of style assessors or following media/tabloid comment analysis. That solution also only applies to people who are in the media anyway and not to everyday users.

    The proposed system assists in maintaining and improving personal appearance by tracking the parts of a user's appearance that are drawing the most attention from other people. By using wearable technology, for example a headset device that includes a camera, it is possible to regularly assess the direction where other people who are observing the user are looking. The system extrapolates the gaze direction to the user's body size and shape to build up a heat map of the duration of gazes overlaid on a body image. Over time the system builds up a history of this map and by using deviations from normal observations is able to identify if people are looking more or less at particular places. These deviations are used to provide different kinds of output to the user. An example is a warning of a newly developed hot spot that could indicate a wardrobe malfunction, some sort of clothing stain or that the chosen style is drawing a lot of attention. Another use is to track longer term changes in appearance, for example, indicating that over the last month people have looked at a particular place 20% more so it could quantify...