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Heat Transfer Sockets for Printed Circuit Board Low Profile Cooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000239008D
Publication Date: 2014-Sep-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Described is a method for removing inner board heat using a socketed printed circuit board (PCB) with a mating, highly-conductive heat spreader. Regions of high conductivity within the board would have strategically placed sockets that allow for an external member to be inserted in to it. Such an external member would fill the gaps in the PCB and move heat to a surface dissipating heat (such as a heat sink or the surface of a case).

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Heat Transfer Sockets for Printed Circuit Board Low Profile Cooling

In slim profile electronic enclosures, inner board heating becomes the predominant thermal problem. In devices such as a solid state drive or a flash storage PCI adapter, high-power components are responsible for overheating other components through a mechanism called "board heating". Board heating occurs when heat transfer through the lid of the high-power component is efficient enough to keep the component at a reliable temperature, but does not supply a significantly better heat path than through the printed circuit board (PCB) on which it lies. This board heating can cause nearby components with more sensitive thermal requirements to experience temperatures over their specified limit. In these applications, supplying a heatsink to the flash is either impossible or restricted enough to be insufficient. Improving the heatsink method for the high-power component can help in some cases, but such an improvement would be restricted by space, or may require extravagant and expensive ways to implement cooling solutions.

Problem: Classic solutions to remove heat from temperature-sensitive components is not sufficient. Space restrictions demand a low-profile method of removing heat that can keep both high-power and low-power components within their respective thermal limits. Proposed is a method for removing inner board heat using a socketed PCB with a mating, highly-conductive heat spreader. Regions of high conductivity within the board would have strategically placed sockets th...