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Method for Tape to Cloud reclamation and defragmentation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000239024D
Publication Date: 2014-Oct-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a Tape to Cloud Device to Tape method for tape reclamation (or defragmentation) that completely defragments a tape without using a local disk or a second tape drive. Data flows from the tape that requires reclaiming, to the cloud, and then back to the tape, thus creating a fully defragmented tape.

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Method for Tape to Cloud reclamation and defragmentation


Tape reclamation (or defragmentation) currently relies upon two methods: Tape to Tape, and Tape to Disk to Tape.

This article introduces a third method: Tape to Cloud Device to Tape. The new method solves use cases in which local disk and tape storage is at a minimum and must be conserved. Currently no known/implemented solutions exist.

The Tape to Cloud Device to Tape method allows a tape to be completely defragmented using neither local disk nor a second tape drive. Data flows from the tape that requires reclaiming, to the cloud, and then back to the tape, thus creating a fully defragmented tape. Cutting down the needs for a second tape drive and local disk space allows a greater occurrence of simultaneous reclamations.

For example, two traditional Tape to Tape reclamation processes occurring at once use four tape drives. The same reclamation processes using the Tape to Cloud method allows a 50% reduction in tape drive usage, to two tapes, and requires no host disk space. Increasing the number of reclamations allowed at once within a tape subsystem enables the system to stay faster (i.e. less time is spent searching/locating over inactive areas of tape space) and contain more room for data (i.e. less inactive tape space).

The process begins with a host that is connected to a tape drive or tape library that contains one or more tapes. The host typically has a customized parameter set to defragment full tapes once the tapes are >X% fragmented. This can be either automated, user specified, or set as a default.

Next, the host must be customized for on...