Browse Prior Art Database

Computer method to derive and display "About this Application" version information of composite components without requiring rebuild of the application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000239196D
Publication Date: 2014-Oct-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to store the signatures of binary distributed files to a database that is accessible by the application, such that the system can display the version information stored with the signature. This method enables the derivation and display of the "About this Application" version information of composite components without requiring a rebuild of the application.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

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Computer method to derive and display "About this Application" version information of composite components without requiring rebuild of the application

Software displays version information in the "About this Application" menu. Standard practice is to recompile code to update the version information. In some instances, the code does not need to be recompiled, yet the version must be incremented. One example is moving from a BETA version to a Released version.

If the BETA is stable and complete, and the only change is to update the version information from BETA to a release version, the code is often recompiled, and then the customer is required to re-install the release version. This requires retransfer and distribution of the compiled code and customer downtime to re-install essentially the same software.

The novel contribution is a method to store the signatures of binary distributed files to a database that is accessible by the application. When the "About this Application" information is requested, the system looks up the signatures in the local database. With this method, the system then displays the version information stored

with the signature. The database may local, and/or located on the World Wide Web (WWW) for lookup and self-updating.

During runtime at the customer site, the customer requests version information about the application that is running.

Figure 1: Embodiment for generating "About this Application" information

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A1: A unique signature of the application is derived. The signature is known to be unique at build time of the software producer. The signature derivation method is stored in the application.

A2: Some singly displaying versions may be a composite from several shipped components.

A3: This identifies that this is the case and combines all components into a single signature. Any missing component does not allow for derivation of the version.

A4: The signature look-up is performed against a local or remote database.

A5: The "About" information and version are displayed to the user.

Creation of the unique signature and derivation method is done at build time of the software producer. It is unlikely that two signatures are identical. If this happens, then methods are described below for altering the signature derivation method to find an alternative signature.

The signature plus the file name needs to be unique; if not, then the second derivation should be used. If that is not unique, then the third is used, and so on.

If no unique signature can be derived then this falls back to standard method to build in the version information.

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Figure 2: Altering the signature d...