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Mass Sectioning of Fine Wire for Use as a Composite Reinforcement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000239253D
Publication Date: 2014-Oct-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Cutting very fine wire is difficult mechanically and logistically. The invention described here is a method, using EDM-cutting and a conductive disc or cylinder, to rapidly section long lengths of wire into selected-length short sections for use as reinforcement in the composite material.

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Mass Sectioning of Fine Wire for Use as a Composite Reinforcement

           

ABSTRACT:

Cutting very fine wire is difficult mechanically and logistically. The invention described here is a method, using EDM-cutting and a conductive disc or cylinder, to rapidly section long lengths of wire into selected-length short sections for use as reinforcement in the composite material.

           

DESCRIPTION:

The purpose of this invention is to efficiently obtain short segments (<1”) of fine wire (1-500µm in diameter) from commercially produced spools of wire (1000-10000m), in order to use the wire segments as short fiber or “whisker” reinforcement in the composite.

Historically, cutting fine wire into short segments is difficult due to several factors. The first is the tendency of fine wire to fit within the clearance of typical cutting instruments (wire cutters, shearing tools), resulting in bending or deformation of the wire, rather than a clean cut. Next, especially in the case of strong materials like tungsten (W) wire, the resistance to cutting offered by the material can rapidly degrade cutting instruments such that they rapidly become dull and cease to cut properly. Lastly, spooled wire requires an extensive number of cuts to convert long lengths into collections of short segments; cutting 1000m of wire into 1” segments would require nearly 40000 cuts.

            The method described in this invention uses a thick circular disc or cylinder of steel (or other metal or electrically conductive material) onto which the wire is wound to provide support, after which the wire itself is sectioned via electrical discharge machining (EDM). If the wire can be obtained on a metal or conducive spool, the spool can be used as the support for the wire). This requires that the wire be strongly bound to the disc/cylinder/spool, otherwise the wire segments can break free and fall out during the cutting process. Binding the wire to the surface can be done wit...