Browse Prior Art Database

Method and System for Detecting the Width and Length of Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000239315D
Publication Date: 2014-Oct-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 178K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method and system for detecting the width and length of objectes using cameras. The core idea is utilizing the distance data stored in EXIF (Exchangeable Image File Format) formatted graphic files so that we can virtually put the "reference objects" on the same plane which a "target object" sits on to get the measurement of the "target object".

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Method and System for Detecting the Width and Length of Objects

Everyone may have had moments like this: you are looking around in a furniture megastore, and suddenly you see something interesting and want to know its measurements. Unfortunately, this information is somehow not available on the price tag, and no rulers in sight. However, you do have brought your smartphone with you, and you begin wondering if it can help you get the measurements with just a few clicks. This is where our invention comes into the rescue -- it can get you the information you want using the smartphone's built-in camera.

    A current solution can be found here (in Traditional Chinese) -> " http://www.uonline.nccu.edu.tw/index_content.asp?sn=6&an=16771". For this existing solution to work, a "reference object" needs to be physically put next to the "target object" you want to measure. As a result, in certain situations -- for example, the "target object" is hung in the air, is across a river, etc. -- this solution will not work because "reference objects" cannot be put in place. As for our invention, no "reference objects" are required in the scene, and therefore we can measure anything we want as long as the "target object" is able to be focused by the camera's lens.

    The core idea is utilizing the distance data stored in EXIF (Exchangeable Image File Format) formatted graphic files so that we can virtually put the "reference objects" on the same plane which a "target object" sits on to get the measurement of the "target object".

    (1) The application identifies the edges of the "target object" after taking a shot. And the distance information is also stored in this EXIF formatted file.

    (2) Based on the distance information, the application then looks up a "reference object" picture with the same distance. The length and width of the "reference object" are publicly known, like we all know the measuremen...