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POINT TO SELECT INTERFACE FOR CONNECTED OBJECT CONTROL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000239649D
Publication Date: 2014-Nov-21

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Brian Sarbin: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This solution uses a user as an interface to select an object connected to the Internet. Using location awareness coupled with motion detection and triangulation technologies, e.g., compass-based directions, gyroscopes, skeleton detection, etc., the user can simply point to the desired object and be presented with controls for that object on a screen of a secondary device.

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POINT TO SELECT INTERFACE FOR CONNECTED OBJECT CONTROL

AUTHORS:

 Brian Sarbin Daniel Garrison Dustin Beltramo

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    This solution uses a user as an interface to select an object connected to the Internet. Using location awareness coupled with motion detection and triangulation technologies, e.g., compass-based directions, gyroscopes, skeleton detection, etc., the user can simply point to the desired object and be presented with controls for that object on a screen of a secondary device.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    With the advent of technology allowing many objects to be connected online, also referred to as the Internet of Everything (IoE), data may be collected and sent between connected objects, allowing a user to control a connected object remotely, e.g., performing an action with a connected object. Many IoE objects are very simple and are essentially reduced to their core elements, leaving advanced configurations, e.g., set-up, controls, etc., to a secondary device, e.g., smartphones, wearable electronic devices (with electronic screens), other tools, etc., that are physically located with or near users as a proxy for receiving input.

    However, smartphone and wearable devices inherently have a level of abstraction with regard to the connected object that they are manipulating. For instance, to tune a radio station on a connected IoE device, a user no longer needs to turn a knob on the physical device itself, but instead, may manipulate a Graphical User Interface (GUI) on a screen of the secondary device. Given the inherent abstraction of the interface for the connected object, it can be difficult for a user to understand how to select and manipulate the connected object using the GUI.

Copyright 2014 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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    This problem is compounded when there are multiple connected objects, especially objects of the same type. As an example, a few light bulbs located in close proximity to each other may each have a corresponding digital representation that is difficult to reference, in terms of what a user would actually see in the physical world. Existing solutions involve either using a device, such as a smartphone and its associated camera, as a proxy to visualize an augmented reality of the connected objects, or require the user to manually tag each object with a naming convention in a GUI, a process that is prone to error and is cumbersome, with many users often skipping this step entirely. As more objects are connected online, the number of connected objects grows exponentially, and the problem of indirect selection is further exacerbated.

    This solution is distinct from existing techniques, such as augmented reality techniques and other techniques involving tracking objects with a camera. While these techniques likewise involve a user using his/her body (or perceiving the use of his/her body) as the selection mechanism, existing implementations are limited to selecting virtual objects on a...